HMS Success (1901)

HMS Success was a B-class torpedo boat destroyer of the Royal Navy. She was launched on 21 March 1901. On 27 December 1914 she was wrecked off Fife Ness during heavy gales.[1]

History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Success
Laid down: 18 September 1899
Launched: 21 March 1901
Completed: May 1902
Commissioned: 9 June 1902
Fate: Wrecked on 27 December 1914
General characteristics
Class and type: Destroyer
Displacement: 380 long tons (386 t)
Length: 214.75 ft (65.46 m)
Beam: 21 ft (6.4 m)
Draught: 8 ft 10 in (2.7 m)
Propulsion:
Speed: 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Armament:

Design and construction

HMS Success was ordered on 30 March 1899 from William Doxford & Sons as part of the British Admiralty's 1899–1900 shipbuilding programme,[2] one of twelve "thirty-knotter" destroyers ordered from various shipyards under this programme.[3] Success closely resembled Doxford's Lee, ordered under the 1897–1898 programme, with the major difference being that the ship had three funnels rather than four.[4]

Success was 215 feet (65.53 m) long overall and 210 feet (64.01 m) between perpendiculars, with a beam of 21 feet (6.40 m) and a draught of 8 feet 10 inches (2.69 m).[4] Displacement was 380 long tons (390 t) light and 425 long tons (432 t) full load.[5] Four Thornycroft boilers fed two triple-expansion engines rated at 6,000 indicated horsepower (4,500 kW) which drove two propeller shafts, giving a speed of 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph).[4][6] Armament was as standard for the "thirty-knotters", with a QF 12 pounder 12 cwt[lower-alpha 1] (3 in (76 mm) calibre) gun on a platform on the ship's conning tower (also used as the ship's bridge), with a secondary armament of five 6-pounder guns, and two 18 inch (450 mm) torpedo tubes.[7][8]

Success was laid down at Doxford's Sunderland shipyard as yard number 282 on 18 September 1899, launched on 21 March 1901 and completed in May 1902.[2]

Service history

Success was commissioned at Portsmouth on 9 June 1902 by Commander Douglas Nicholson and the crew of HMS Dove, which had been docked for repairs after going aground.[9] She succeeded the latter ship in the Portsmouth instructional flotilla,[10] and took part in the fleet review held at Spithead on 16 August 1902 for the coronation of King Edward VII.[11]

References

  1. "Cwt" is the abbreviation for hundredweight, 12cwt referring to the weight of the gun.
  1. "The Great War Diary" (PDF). Archived from the original (pdf) on 25 October 2006. Retrieved 14 February 2007.
  2. Lyon 2001, p. 84.
  3. Lyon 2001, p. 25.
  4. Lyon 2001, pp. 83–84.
  5. Chesneau and Kolesnick 1979, pp. 96.
  6. Brassey 1902, p. 275.
  7. Lyon 2001, pp. 98–99.
  8. Friedman 2009, p. 40.
  9. "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36790). London. 10 June 1902. p. 12.
  10. "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36786). London. 5 June 1902. p. 7.
  11. "Naval Review at Spithead". The Times (36847). London. 15 August 1902. p. 5.
  • Brassey, T.A. (1902). The Naval Annual 1902. Portsmouth, UK: J. Griffin and Co.
  • Chesneau, Roger; Kolesnik, Eugene M (1979). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-133-5.
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9.
  • Gardiner, Robert; Gray, Randal (1985). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-245-5.
  • Lyon, David (2001). The First Destroyers. London: Caxton Editions. ISBN 1-84067-3648.
  • Manning, T. D. (1961). The British Destroyer. London: Putnam & Co. Ltd.
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