HMS Slinger (1917)

HMS Slinger was an experimental catapult ship operated by the Royal Navy during the First World War. After Royal Navy service from 1917 to 1919, she operated as a commercial cargo ship under the names SS Niki and SS Lingfield from 1920 until she sank in 1941.

History
Royal Navy
Name: HMS Slinger
Builder: Lobnitz and Company, Limited
Launched: 1917
Acquired: 1917
Commissioned: 1917
Fate: Sold 16 October 1919
History
Greece
Name: SS Niki
Operator: Boyazides L, Brother & Company
Acquired: 1920
In service: 1920
Fate: Sold 1934
History
Greece
Name: SS Niki
Operator: Valsamakis & Company
Acquired: 1934
In service: 1934
Fate: Sold 1937
History
Greece
Name: SS Niki
Operator: Nomikos Petros
Acquired: 1937
In service: 1937
Fate: Sold 1937
History
United Kingdom
Name: SS Lingfield
Operator: Finchley Steamship Company
Acquired: 1937
In service: 1937
Fate: Sunk in collision 17 October 1941
General characteristics
(as HMS Slinger)
Tonnage: 875 gross tons
General characteristics
(As commercial cargo ship)[1]
Tonnage: 1,002 gross tons
Length: 195 feet 4 inches (59.54 meters)
Beam: 35 feet 5 inches (10.80 meters)
Draught: 14 feet 5 inches (4.39 meters)
Propulsion: one 3-cylinder triple expansion steam engine, one shaft, 1,030 ihp (768 Kw)
Speed: 10 knots

Royal Navy service

Constructed as a hopper barge, HMS Slinger was purchased from her builder, Lobnitz and Company, Limited of Renfrew, Scotland, prior to completion. Intending to use her as a test bed for the shipborne launching of aircraft, the Royal Navy fitted her with a 60-foot (18.25-meter) compressed air catapult. HMS Slinger operated Fairey F.127 and Short 310 seaplanes during 1918.

Slinger was sold on 16 October 1919.

Later career

After her sale, the ship was converted into a merchant cargo ship. She entered commercial service under the Greek flag with Boyazides L, Brother & Company in 1920 as SS Niki. Niki was sold to Valsamakis & Company in 1934 and to Nomikos Petros in 1937, remaining under Greek ownership and registry throughout.[1] On 28 July 1920, Niki arrived leaking at Liverpool and was beached at Tranmere. Cheshire.[2] She was refloated, repaired, and returned to service.

Niki was sold to Valsamakis & Company in 1934 and to Nomikos Petros in 1937, remaining under Greek ownership and registry throughout.[1] Later in 1937, Niki was sold to the Finchley Steamship Company and, under British registry, was renamed SS Lingfield. Lingfield continued to operate as a commercial cargo ship until 17 October 1941, when she collided with another vessel in the North Sea off the coast of Norfolk, England, and sank.[1]

Notes

  1. "SS Lingfield (+1941)". Wrecksite. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  2. "Casualty reports". The Times (42475). London. 29 July 1920. col E, p. 19.

References

  • Dittmar, F. J. & Colledge, J. J., "British Warships 1914-1919", (Ian Allan, London, 1972), ISBN 0-7110-0380-7


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