HAZMAT Class 1 Explosives

Hazmat Class 1 are Explosive materials, which are any substance or article, including a device, which is designed to function by explosion or which, by chemical reaction within itself is able to function in a similar manner even if not designed to function by explosion.[lower-alpha 1]

Class 1 consists of six 'divisions', that describes the potential hazard posed by the explosive. The division number is the second number after the decimal point on a placard.[lower-alpha 2] The classification has an additional layer, of categorization, known as 'compatibility groups', which breaks explosives in the same division into one of 13 groups, identified by a letter, which is used to separate incompatible explosives from each other. This letter also appears on the placard, following the number.[lower-alpha 3]

The movement of class 1 materials is tightly regulated, especially for divisions 1.1 and 1.2, which represent some of the most dangerous explosives, with the greatest potential for destruction and loss of life. Regulations in the United States require drivers have and follow a pre-prepared route, not park the vehicle within 300 feet (91 m) of bridges, tunnels, a fire, or crowded places.[1] The vehicle must be attended to by its driver at all times while its parked. Drivers are also required to carry the following paperwork and keep it in an accessible and easy to locate location: written emergency instructions, written route plan, a copy of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations, Part 397 - Transport of Hazardous Materials; driving and parking rules. [2] Some tunnels and bridges severally restrict or completely forbid vehicles carrying Class 1 cargoes.[3][4]

Divisions

Placards

United States Department of Transportation PlacardsUN Transport PlacardDivision NumberRiskExamples
(N/A)
Basic placard for explosive materials - Division not specified
Anything listed below
1.1
Mass explosion risk
1.2
Blast and Projection risk
Hand grenades
1.3
Minor blast risk
1.4
Major fire risk
1.5
Blasting agents
Type E water emulsion blasting agents
1.6
Extremely insensitive explosives

Compatibility Table

Transportation segregation table

Load and Segregation Chart
  Weight 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.3 3 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 6.1 7 8 9
A B A
1.1 Any quantity  
1.2 Any quantity  
1.3 Any Quantity  
1.4 1,001 lb (454 kg) O  OOO     O O 
1.5 1,001 lb (454 kg)  
1.6 1,001 lb (454 kg)                
Key
The absence of any hazard class or division or a blank space in the table indicates that no restrictions apply.
  • : This indicates that segregation among different Class 1 materials is governed by the compatibility group table in 49CFR 177.848(f).
  • X: These materials may not be loaded, transported, or stored together in the same transport vehicle or storage facility during the course of transportation.
  • O: Indicates that these materials may not be loaded, transported or stored together in the same transport vehicle or storage facility during the course of transportation, unless separated in a manner that, in the event of leakage from packages under conditions normally incident to transportation, commingling of hazardous materials would not occur.


Source: United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 CFR §177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.[7]

Compatibility Group Table

Compatibility Table for Class 1 Materials
  A B C D E F G H J K L N S
A  
B  44/5
C  2234/5
D 42 234/5
E 22 34/5
F  4/5
G  4/5
H  4/5
J  4/5
K  4/5
L 1
N  4/5
S 4/54/54/54/54/54/54/54/54/54/54/5 
Notes
A blank space in the table indicates that no restrictions apply.
  • X: Indicates that explosives of different compatibility groups may not be carried on the same transport vehicle.
  • 1: An explosive from compatibility group L shall only be carried on the same transport vehicle with an identical explosive.
  • 2: Any combination of explosives from compatibility groups C, D, or E is assigned to compatibility group E.
  • 3: Any combination of explosives from compatibility groups C, D, or E with those in compatibility group N is assigned to compatibility group D.
  • 4: Refer to 49 CFR 177.835(g) when transporting detonators.
  • 5: Division 1.4S fireworks may not be loaded on the same transport vehicle with Division 1.1 or 1.2 materials.

Except as provided in the following paragraph, explosives of the same compatibility group but of different divisions may be transported together provided that the whole shipment is transported as though its entire contents were of the lower numerical division (i.e., Division 1.1 being lower than 1.2). For example, a mixed shipment of Division 1.2 materials and Division 1.4 materials, both of compatibility group D, must be transported as Division 1.2 materials

When Division 1.5 materials, compatibility group D, are transported in the same freight container as Division 1.2 materials, compatibility group D, the shipment must be transported as Division 1.1 materials, compatibility group D.


Source: United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 CFR §177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.[8]

See Also

Notes

  1. In the United States, an article that meets this guideline, might be otherwise classed in a different class under a provision of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
  2. Example: A division 1 explosive is shown as "1.1" on the placard.
  3. Most diagrams of placards, including the ones in this article, represent the compatibility group letter with an asterisk ( * ) as a placeholder.

References

  1. Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (March 2017). "Commercial Driver's Manual - PUB 223" (PDF). pp. 9:11-9:26. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 March 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  2. United States Department of Transportation (June 6, 2019). "PART 397—TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; DRIVING AND PARKING RULES". eCFR. Archived from the original on 10 June 2019. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  3. Pennsylvania Turnpike. "Placarded Loads". Archived from the original on 30 March 2019. Retrieved 20 July 2019. All Table 1 Materials and All Explosives are prohibited.
  4. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. "Hazardous Materials - Transportation Regulations at Tunnel and Bridge Facilities -" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 June 2019. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  5. Clayton Penistone Group (25 April 2016). "Safety Data Sheet - Railway Fog Signal". Archived from the original (English) on 21 November 2016. Retrieved 16 July 2019.
  6. Estes Industries (23 October 2014). "Safety Data Sheet - Model Rocket Motor" (PDF). Retrieved 16 July 2019.
  7. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) (October 1, 2011). "49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials" (PDF). Government Publishing Office. p. 852. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 July 2019. Retrieved 16 July 2019.
  8. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) (October 1, 2011). "49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials" (PDF). Government Publishing Office. p. 853. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 July 2019. Retrieved 16 July 2019.


This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.