Greenlee

Greenlee is an industrial and electrical tool company headquartered in Rockford, Illinois, United States. It was founded in 1862 by brothers Robert and Ralph Greenlee to manufacture their invention, a drill surrounded by four chisel blades, used in making the pockets for a mortise and tenon joint, for the furniture industry in Rockford. This device is still used in cabinetmaking. The brothers later diversified into a variety of hand woodworking tools as well as machinery for making wooden barrels. The company was acquired by Textron in 1986. Greenlee purchased Fairmont Hydraulics in 1992 and German tool manufacturer Klauke in 1996. Greenlee expanded into data/tele communications equipment with the acquisition of several companies in 1999 and 2000 which now fall under the Greenlee Communications brand. Greenlee expanded its DIY offering with the addition of Paladin Tools on December 17, 2007. In 2013, Sherman + Reilly, and HD Electric joined the Greenlee family of Utility brands.The Greenlee brothers were inspired into industrial work by their father who was a Cooper, a barrel maker. Their contributions to the railroad industry were incredible including an automatic tie and track laying drilling machine that rolled right along behind on the track it had just laid.

Greenlee
Subsidiary
Founded1862
Headquarters,
ParentEmerson Electric
Websitewww.greenlee.com

On April 18, 2018 Textron announced that it planned to sell its Greenlee brand to Emerson within the next 90 days.[1]

Products

  • Hand Tools - professional grade hand tool line launched in 2006
  • Holemaking - bits, punches, knockouts
  • Bending - conduit benders
  • Fishing & Cable Pulling
  • Wire & Cable Termination
  • Voice Data Video
  • Testing & Measurement
  • Storage & Material Handling
  • Hydraulic Pumps & Miscellaneous
  • Plumbing
  • Utility - impact wrenches, cutting and crimping tools

References

  1. Reuters. "Textron to sell its tool business to Ferguson-based Emerson". stltoday.com. Retrieved 2018-05-08.
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