Governor of Pendennis Castle

The Governor of Pendennis Castle was a military officer who commanded the fortifications at Pendennis Castle, part of the defenses of the River Fal and Carrick Roads, on the south coast of Cornwall near Falmouth. Originally fortified under Henry VIII, defenses in the area were intermittently maintained through World War II. The office of governor was abolished in 1837, when Gen. Anderson received the colonelcy of the 78th Regiment of Foot.

Governors of Pendennis Castle

The early Governorship was a quasi-hereditary office, whose holders were as follows:

  • John III Killigrew (d.1567) of Arwenack, Falmouth, first Governor, appointed by King Henry VIII.[1] His monumental brass survives in St Budock's Church, Budock Water, near Falmouth, inscribed as follows:
"Heere lyeth John Killigrew, Esquier, of Arwenack and lord of ye manor of Killigrew in Cornewall, and Elizabeth Trewinnard his wife. He was the first Captaine of Pendennis Castle, made by King Henry the eight and so continued untill the nynth of Queene Elizabeth at which time God tooke him to his mercye, being the yeare of Our Lord 1567. Sr John Killigrew, Knight, his son(n)e succeeded him in ye same place by the gift of Queene Elizabeth".[2]

Lieutenant-Governors of Pendennis

  • c.1613: Sir Nicholas Halse [21]
  • c.1628: John Tresahar [21]
  • 1658–: Robert Roberts [21]
  • 1663–: Colonel Legg [21]
  • 1666–: Sir John Stevens [21]
  • 1697-1717 Captain Richard Trevanion [22]
  • 1729–1739?: John Folliott
  • ?–1747: Daniel Houghton
  • 1747–?: John Waite[23]
  • 1749–1769: Richard Bowles[24]
  • 12 January 1770 – 1776: William Fawcett
  • 1776–1797: Nevinson Poole[25]
  • 1797–1811: Philip Melvill
  • 1811–1814: James Considine[26]
  • 1814–1832: William Fenwick[27]
  • 1832–1835: Loftus Grey
  • office abolished

References

  1. Dunkin, Edwin Hadlow Wise, The Monumental Brasses of Cornwall with Descriptive, Genealogical and Heraldic Notes, 1882, pp.36-7
  2. Dunkin, Edwin Hadlow Wise, The Monumental Brasses of Cornwall with Descriptive, Genealogical and Heraldic Notes, 1882, pp.36-7, Plate 31
  3. Pedigree of Killigrew, Vivian, J.L., ed. (1887). The Visitations of Cornwall: comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1530, 1573 & 1620; with additions by J.L. Vivian. Exeter, p.268
  4. History of Parliament biography
  5. Nicholas Hals Pender, A Falmouth Guide: Containing a Concise Account of the History, Trade, Port and Public Establishments of Falmouth, etc., Falmouth, 1825, p.86
  6. Lysons, Magna Britannia, Vol.3, p.48
  7. "PARKER, John II (1548-1617), of Willingdon, Suss. and Charing Cross, London". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  8. History of Parliament biography
  9. Pedigree of Killigrew, Vivian, J.L., ed. (1887). The Visitations of Cornwall: comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1530, 1573 & 1620; with additions by J.L. Vivian. Exeter, pp.268,270
  10. "KILLIGREW, Sir William II (1606-1695), of Pendennis Castle, Cornw.; later of Lincoln's Inn Fields, London and Kempton Park, Mdx". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  11. See History of Parliament biography of Sir William Killigrew (1606–1695)
  12. http://www.fortescue.org
  13. Nicholas Hals Pender, A Falmouth Guide, 1825, p.86
  14. Nicholas Hals Pender, A Falmouth Guide, 1825, p.86
  15. Nicholas Hals Pender, A Falmouth Guide, 1825, p.86
  16. They shared common descent from Sir Thomas Grenville (died 1513)
  17. "No. 7620". The London Gazette. 19 July 1737. p. 2.
  18. "No. 9312". The London Gazette. 16 October 1753. p. 3.
  19. "No. 11511". The London Gazette. 19 November 1774. p. 1.
  20. "No. 18959". The London Gazette. 24 July 1832. p. 1703.
  21. Pendennis and St Mawes.
  22. Sandoe-Gilbert, Charles (1820). The HIstorical Survey of the County of Cornwall volume 2. Congdon. p. 307.
  23. "No. 8725". The London Gazette. 5 March 1747. p. 2.
  24. "No. 8874". The London Gazette. 8 August 1749. p. 1.
  25. "No. 11719". The London Gazette. 16 November 1776. p. 1.
  26. "No. 16539". The London Gazette. 9 November 1811. p. 2167.
  27. "No. 16848". The London Gazette. 25 January 1814. p. 211.
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