Fred Keating

Frederic Serrano Keating (March 27, 1901[1] – June 29, 1961),[2][lower-alpha 1] most well known as Fred Keating, was an American magician, stage and film actor.[6][7]

Fred Keating
Born(1901-03-27)March 27, 1901
DiedJune 29, 1961(1961-06-29) (aged 60)
OccupationActor
Years active1929–1940 (film)

Biography

Keating was born in New York City, the son of Frederick Keating (Senior), a lawyer, and Camille Serrano, a singer. He was of Irish-Spanish heritage. His parents divorced when he was young.[8][9] He became interested in magic from an early age. He became well known for performing a disappearing canary cage trick.[10] Keating also performed a trick where he swallowed needles and pulled them threaded, out of his mouth.[11]

Selected filmography

Notes

  1. While his New York Times obituary reported that he died aged 64, suggesting a birth year of 1897, primary sources – including New York birth indexes and census records – indicate he was born in 1901.[3][4][5]

References

  1. "Italiangen.org".
  2. "Fred Keating, 64, Magician, Is Dead; Stage and Screen Actor Had Been Vaudeville Headliner". The New York Times. July 1, 1961. p. 17. (subscription required)
  3. "New York City Births, 1846-1909". FamilySearch. Retrieved 4 April 2018. (registration required)
  4. "New York State Census, 1905". FamilySearch. Retrieved 4 April 2018. (registration required)
  5. "United States Census, 1920". FamilySearch. Retrieved 4 April 2018. (registration required)
  6. Price, p. 349
  7. Pitts, p. 220
  8. "Minute Biographies: Fred Keating". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. June 19, 1933. p. 13.
  9. "New York Marriages, 1686-1980". FamilySearch. Retrieved 6 April 2018. (registration required)
  10. Curry, pp. 58-59.
  11. Slide, p. 55

Bibliography

  • Curry, Paul. (1965). Magician's Magic. Dover Publications.
  • Pitts, Michael R. (2015). RKO Radio Pictures Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Films, 1929-1956. McFarland.
  • Price, David. (1985). Magic: A Pictorial History of Conjurers in the Theater. Cornwall Books.
  • Slide, Anthony. (1981). The Vaudevillians: A Dictionary of Vaudeville Performers. Arlington House.


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