Frankenstein '80

Frankenstein '80 is a 1972 Italian film directed by Mario Mancini.

Frankenstein '80
Italian film poster
Directed byMario Mancini
Screenplay by
  • Ferdinando De Leone
  • Mario Mancini
Story byFerdinando De Leone[1]
Starring
Music byDaniele Patucchi[1]
CinematographyEmilio Varriano[1]
Edited byEnzo Micarelli[1]
Production
company
M.G.D. Film[1]
Distributed byLes Films 2R Roma
Release date
  • 12 December 1972 (1972-12-12) (Italy)
Running time
89 minutes[1]
CountryItaly[1]

Plot summary

By day, Dr. Frankenstein (Gordon Mitchell) works innocuously in his lab. But at night, he works to perfect Mosaico (Xiro Papas), a monstrosity pieced together from dead bodies. Once completed, the behemoth escapes from the lab and embarks on a killing spree. Local beauties begin popping up dead, murdered in a variety of gruesome ways, as authorities attempt to stop Mosaico's rampage.

Cast

Production

Despite the films title alluding to Mary Shelley's character, the film has little in common with her creation.[2] The inspiration of Ferdinando De Leone and Mario Mancini's script was from the adult only comics such as Oltretomba.[1][2] Future Academy Awards winner Carlo Rambaldi provided the special effects in the film such as the monster named Mosaic.[2][3] Curti referred to the special effects as "crude" and was an "early hint of the tendency towards excess that will characterise Italian genre cinema of the decade"[2]

Lou Castel was originally going to act in the film but was not allowed after being expelled from Italy in April 1972 due to his political views.[4] Actor Gordon Mitchell stated that parts of the film were possibly shot in Bavaria, but not any of the scenes he was involved in.[4] The rest of the film was shot in Munich and Rome.[1]

Release

Frankenstein '80 was released in Italy on 12 December 1972 where it was distributed by Les Films 2R Roma.[1] Film historian Roberto Curti stated that the film "passed almost unnoticed in Italy at the time of its release"[4] A photonovel version of the film was released in the Italian issue of Cinesex in May 1973.[4]

As of 2017, the film is in the public domain in the United States.[4]

Reception

From retrospective reviews, AllMovie called the film "stupid, sickening, and obscene", but "seekers of psychotronic cinema will have a field day with this ridiculous Italian exploitation product."[5] In his book on Italian horror film directors, Louis Paul referred to the film as "strange" and "a lurid sex film dressed as a horror movie."[6]

References

Footnotes

  1. Curti 2017, p. 69.
  2. Curti 2017, p. 70.
  3. Celli & Cottino-Jones 2007, p. 106.
  4. Curti 2017, p. 71.
  5. Fred Beldin. "Frankenstein 80 (1972)". AllMovie. Retrieved 30 June 2012.
  6. Paul 2005, p. 28.

Sources

  • Celli, C.; Cottino-Jones, M. C (2007). A New Guide to Italian Cinema. Springer. ISBN 0-230-60182-0.
  • Curti, Roberto (2017). Italian Gothic Horror Films, 1970-1979. McFarland. ISBN 1476629609.
  • Paul, Louis (2005). Italian Horror Film Directors. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-8749-3.
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