FIFA U-20 World Cup

The FIFA U-20 World Cup is the biennial football world championship for male players under the age of 20, organised by FIFA. The competition has been staged every two years since the first tournament in 1977 held in Tunisia.[1] Until 2005 it was known as the FIFA World Youth Championship. The current champion is Ukraine, which won its first title at the 2019 tournament in Poland.

FIFA U-20 World Cup
Founded1977 (1977)
RegionInternational (FIFA)
Number of teams24
Current champions Ukraine (1st title)
Most successful team(s) Argentina (6 titles)
WebsiteU-20 World Cup

History

In the twenty-two tournaments held, eleven different nations have won the title. Argentina is the most successful team with six titles, followed by Brazil with five titles. Portugal and Serbia have both won two titles (with the latter winning once as Yugoslavia), while Ghana, Germany, Spain, France, England, Ukraine and Russia (as the USSR with Ukrainian players Bessonov, Bal) have won the title once each.

A corresponding event for women's teams, the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, began in 2002 with the name "FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship" and an age limit of 19. The age limit for the women's competition was changed to 20 beginning with the 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship, and the competition was renamed as a "World Cup" in 2007 in preparation for the 2008 event. The next edition will be held in 2021 in Indonesia.

Qualification

24 teams appear in the final tournament. 23 countries, including the defending champions, have to qualify in the youth championships of the six confederations. The host country automatically qualifies.

Confederation Championship
AFC (Asia) AFC U-19 Championship
CAF (Africa) African Youth Championship
CONCACAF (North, Central America and Caribbean) CONCACAF Under-20 Championship
CONMEBOL (South America) South American Youth Football Championship
UEFA (Europe) UEFA European U-19 Championship
OFC (Oceania) OFC Under 20 Qualifying Tournament

Results

Summaries

FIFA World Youth Championship

# Year Hosts Final Third place match Number of teams
Champions Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
1 1977
Details
 Tunisia
Soviet Union
2–2 (a.e.t.)
9–8 (p)

Mexico

Brazil
4–0
Uruguay
16
2 1979
Details
 Japan
Argentina
3–1
Soviet Union

Uruguay
1–1 (a.e.t.)
5–3 (p)

Poland
16
3 1981
Details
 Australia
West Germany
4–0
Qatar

Romania
1–0
England
16
4 1983
Details
 Mexico
Brazil
1–0
Argentina

Poland
2–1 (a.e.t.)
South Korea
16
5 1985
Details
 Soviet Union
Brazil
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Spain

Nigeria
0–0 (a.e.t.)
3–1 (p)

Soviet Union
16
6 1987
Details
 Chile
Yugoslavia
1–1 (a.e.t.)
5–4 (p)

West Germany

East Germany
2–2 (a.e.t.)
3–1 (p)

Chile
16
7 1989
Details
 Saudi Arabia
Portugal
2–0
Nigeria

Brazil
2–0
United States
16
8 1991
Details
 Portugal
Portugal
0–0 (a.e.t.)
4–2 (p)

Brazil

Soviet Union
1–1 (a.e.t.)
5–4 (p)

Australia
16
9 1993
Details
 Australia
Brazil
2–1
Ghana

England
2–1
Australia
16
10 1995
Details
 Qatar
Argentina
2–0
Brazil

Portugal
3–2
Spain
16
11 1997
Details
 Malaysia
Argentina
2–1
Uruguay

Republic of Ireland
2–1
Ghana
24
12 1999
Details
 Nigeria
Spain
4–0
Japan

Mali
1–0
Uruguay
24
13 2001
Details
 Argentina
Argentina
3–0
Ghana

Egypt
1–0
Paraguay
24
14 2003
Details
 United Arab Emirates
Brazil
1–0
Spain

Colombia
2–1
Argentina
24
15 2005
Details
 Netherlands
Argentina
2–1
Nigeria

Brazil
2–1
Morocco
24

FIFA U-20 World Cup

# Year Hosts Final Third place match Number of teams
Champions Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
16 2007
Details
 Canada
Argentina
2–1
Czech Republic

Chile
1–0
Austria
24
17 2009
Details
 Egypt
Ghana
0–0 (a.e.t.)
4–3 (p)

Brazil

Hungary
1–1 (a.e.t.)
2–0 (p)

Costa Rica
24
18 2011
Details
 Colombia
Brazil
3–2 (a.e.t.)
Portugal

Mexico
3–1
France
24
19 2013
Details
 Turkey
France
0–0 (a.e.t.)
4–1 (p)

Uruguay

Ghana
3–0
Iraq
24
20 2015
Details
 New Zealand
Serbia
2–1 (a.e.t.)
Brazil

Mali
3–1
Senegal
24
21 2017
Details
 South Korea
England
1–0
Venezuela

Italy
0–0 (a.e.t.)
4–1 (p)

Uruguay
24
22 2019
Details
 Poland
Ukraine
3–1
South Korea

Ecuador
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Italy
24
23 2021
Details
 Indonesia 24
  • Key:
    • a.e.t. – after extra time
    • pen. – match won on penalty shootout

Performances by countries

Below are the 37 nations that have reached at least the semifinal in the U-20 World Cup finals.

FIFA U-20 World Cup
Rank Team Titles Runners-up Third place Fourth place Total (top four)
1  Argentina 6 (1979, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2007) 1 (1983) 1 (2003) 8
2  Brazil 5 (1983, 1985, 1993, 2003, 2011) 4 (1991, 1995, 2009, 2015) 3 (1977, 1989, 2005) 12
3  Portugal 2 (1989, 1991) 1 (2011) 1 (1995) 4
4  Serbia1 2 (19871, 2015) 2
5  Ghana 1 (2009) 2 (1993, 2001) 1 (2013) 1 (1997) 5
6  Spain 1 (1999) 2 (1985, 2003) 1 (1995) 4
7  Russia2 1 (1977) 1 (1979) 1 (1991) 1 (1985) 4
8  Germany3 1 (1981) 1 (1987) 2
9  England 1 (2017) 1 (1993) 1 (1981) 3
10  France 1 (2013) 1 (2011) 2
11  Ukraine 1 (2019) 1
12  Uruguay 2 (1997, 2013) 1 (1979) 3 (1977, 1999, 2017) 6
13  Nigeria 2 (1989, 2005) 1 (1985) 3
14  Mexico 1 (1977) 1 (2011) 2
15  South Korea 1 (2019) 1 (1983) 2
16  Qatar 1 (1981) 1
 Japan 1 (1999) 1
 Czech Republic 1 (2007) 1
 Venezuela 1 (2017) 1
20  Mali 2 (1999, 2015) 2
21  Poland 1 (1983) 1 (1979) 2
 Chile 1 (2007) 1 (1987) 2
 Italy 1 (2017) 1 (2019) 2
24  Romania 1 (1981) 1
 East Germany 1 (1987) 1
 Republic of Ireland 1 (1997) 1
 Egypt 1 (2001) 1
 Colombia 1 (2003) 1
 Hungary 1 (2009) 1
 Ecuador 1 (2019) 1
31  Australia 2 (1991, 1993) 2
32  United States 1 (1989) 1
 Paraguay 1 (2001) 1
 Morocco 1 (2005) 1
 Austria 1 (2007) 1
 Costa Rica 1 (2009) 1
 Iraq 1 (2013) 1
 Senegal 1 (2015) 1

1 As Yugoslavia. 2 As Soviet Union. 3 As West Germany.

Performances by continental zones

All continental confederations except for the OFC (Oceania) have made an appearance in the final match of the tournament. To date, CONMEBOL (South America) leads with eleven titles, followed by UEFA (Europe) with ten titles and CAF (Africa) with one title. Teams from the AFC (Asia) and CONCACAF (North America, Central America, Caribbean) have made the tournament final four times, but were defeated by strong UEFA sides. No current OFC member has ever made the semifinals; Australia reached the semifinals as an OFC member in 1991 and 1993, finishing fourth on both occasions, before the country joined the AFC in 2006.

Confederation (continent) Performances
Winners Runners-up Third Fourth
CONMEBOL (South America) 11 titles: Argentina (6), Brazil (5) 8 times: Brazil (4), Uruguay (2), Argentina (1), Venezuela (1) 7 times: Brazil (3), Chile (1), Colombia (1), Ecuador (1), Uruguay (1) 6 times: Uruguay (3), Argentina (1), Chile (1), Paraguay (1)
UEFA (Europe) 10 titles: Portugal (2), Serbia1 (2), England (1), France (1), West Germany (1), Spain (1), Ukraine (1), USSR (1) 6 times: Spain (2), Czech Republic (1), West Germany (1), Portugal (1), USSR (1) 9 times: England (1), East Germany (1), Hungary (1), Rep. of Ireland (1), Italy (1), Poland (1), Portugal (1), Romania (1), USSR (1) 7 times: Austria (1), England (1), France (1), Italy (1), Poland (1), Spain (1), USSR (1)
CAF (Africa) 1 title: Ghana (1) 4 times: Ghana (2), Nigeria (2) 5 times: Mali (2), Egypt (1), Ghana (1), Nigeria (1) 3 times: Ghana (1), Morocco (1), Senegal (1)
AFC (Asia) None 3 times: Japan (1), Qatar (1), South Korea (1) None 2 times: Iraq (1), South Korea (1)
CONCACAF (North, Central America and Caribbean) None 1 time: Mexico (1) 1 time: Mexico (1) 2 times: Costa Rica (1), United States (1)
OFC (Oceania) None None None 2 times: Australia2 (2)
1 = as Yugoslavia (1987).
2 = as part of OFC (currently in AFC since 2006).

Awards

Golden Ball

The Adidas Golden Ball award is awarded to the player who plays the most outstanding football during the tournament. It is selected by the media poll. Since the 2007 tournament, those who finish as runners-up in the vote receive the Silver Ball and Bronze Ball awards as the second and third most outstanding players in the tournament respectively.

World Cup Golden Ball Silver Ball Bronze Ball Ref(s)
1977 Tunisia Volodymyr Bessonov Júnior Brasília Cléber [2]
1979 Japan Diego Maradona Julio César Romero Ramón Díaz [3]
1981 Australia Romulus Gabor Michael Zorc Roland Wohlfarth [4]
1983 Mexico Geovani Roberto Zárate Luis Islas [5]
1985 Soviet Union Paulo Silas Gérson Juan Carlos Unzué [6]
1987 Chile Robert Prosinečki Zvonimir Boban Marcel Witeczek [7]
1989 Saudi Arabia Bismarck Kasey Keller Christopher Nwosu [8]
1991 Portugal Emílio Peixe Giovane Élber Paulo Torres [9]
1993 Australia Adriano Not awarded Not awarded [10]
1995 Qatar Caio Dani Joaquín Irigoytía [11]
1997 Malaysia Nicolás Olivera Marcelo Zalayeta Pablo Aimar [12]
1999 Nigeria Seydou Keita Pius Ikedia Pablo Couñago [13]
2001 Argentina Javier Saviola Andrés D'Alessandro Djibril Cissé [14]
2003 United Arab Emirates Ismail Matar Dudu Dani Alves [15]
2005 Netherlands Lionel Messi John Obi Mikel Taye Taiwo [16]
2007 Canada Sergio Agüero Maxi Moralez Giovani dos Santos [17]
2009 Egypt Dominic Adiyiah Alex Teixeira Giuliano [18]
2011 Colombia Henrique Almeida Nélson Oliveira Jorge Enríquez [19]
2013 Turkey Paul Pogba Nicolás López Clifford Aboagye [20]
2015 New Zealand Adama Traoré Danilo Sergej Milinković-Savić [21]
2017 South Korea Dominic Solanke Federico Valverde Yangel Herrera [22]
2019 Poland Lee Kang-in Serhiy Buletsa Gonzalo Plata [23]
2021 Indonesia

Golden Boot

The Golden Boot (known commercially as the Adidas Golden Shoe) is awarded to the top goalscorer of the tournament. If more than one players are equal by same goals, the players will be selected based by the most assists made and, if still tied, less playing minutes recorded during the tournament.

World Cup Golden Boot Goals Silver Boot Goals Bronze Boot Goals Ref(s)
1977 Tunisia Guina 4 Hussein Saeed 3 Luis Placencia 3 [2]
1979 Japan Ramón Díaz 8 Diego Maradona 6 Andrzej Palasz 5 [3]
1981 Australia Mark Koussas 4 Taher Amer 4 Ralf Loose 4 [4]
1983 Mexico Geovani 6 Joachim Klemenz 5 Jorge Luis Gabrich 4 [5]
1985 Soviet Union Sebastián Losada 3 Fernando 3 Odiaka Monday 3 [6]
1987 Chile Marcel Witeczek 7 Davor Šuker 6 Camilo Pino 5 [7]
1989 Saudi Arabia Oleg Salenko 5 Marcelo Henrique 3 Christopher Ohen 3 [8]
1991 Portugal Sergei Sherbakov 5 Ismael Urzaiz 4 Pedro Pineda 4 [9]
1993 Australia Henry Zambrano 3 Chris Faklaris 3 Vicente Nieto 3 [10]
1995 Qatar Joseba Etxeberria 7 Caio 5 Dani 4 [11]
1997 Malaysia Adaílton 10 David Trezeguet 5 Kostas Salapasidis 4 [12]
1999 Nigeria Pablo Couñago 5 Mahamadou Dissa 5 Taylor Twellman 4 [13]
2001 Argentina Javier Saviola 11 Adriano 6 Djibril Cissé 6 [14]
2003 United Arab Emirates Eddie Johnson 4 Daisuke Sakata 4 Fernando Cavenaghi 4 [15]
2005 Netherlands Lionel Messi 6 Fernando Llorente 5 Oleksandr Aliyev 5 [16]
2007 Canada Sergio Agüero 6 Adrián 5 Maxi Moralez 4 [17]
2009 Egypt Dominic Adiyiah 8 Vladimir Koman 5 Aarón 4 [18]
2011 Colombia Henrique Almeida 5 Álvaro Vázquez 5 Alexandre Lacazette 5 [19]
2013 Turkey Ebenezer Assifuah 6 Bruma 5 Jesé 5 [20]
2015 New Zealand Viktor Kovalenko 5 Bence Mervo 5 Marc Stendera 4 [21]
2017 South Korea Riccardo Orsolini 5 Josh Sargent 4 Jean-Kévin Augustin 4 [22]
2019 Poland Erling Håland 9 Danylo Sikan 4 Amadou Sagna 4 [23]
2021 Indonesia

Golden Glove

The Golden Glove is awarded to the best goalkeeper of the tournament.

World Cup Golden Gloves Ref(s)
2009 Egypt Esteban Alvarado [18]
2011 Colombia Mika [19]
2013 Turkey Guillermo de Amores [20]
2015 New Zealand Predrag Rajković [21]
2017 South Korea Freddie Woodman [22]
2019 Poland Andriy Lunin [23]
2021 Indonesia

FIFA Fair Play Award

FIFA Fair Play Award is given to the team who has the best fair play record during the tournament with the criteria set by FIFA Fair Play Committee.

Tournament FIFA Fair Play Award Ref(s)
1977 Tunisia  Brazil [2]
1979 Japan  Poland [3]
1981 Australia  Australia [4]
1983 Mexico  South Korea [5]
1985 USSR  Colombia [6]
1987 Chile  West Germany [7]
1989 Saudi Arabia  United States [8]
1991 Portugal  Soviet Union [9]
1993 Australia  England [10]
1995 Qatar  Japan [11]
1997 Malaysia  Argentina [12]
1999 Nigeria  Croatia [13]
2001 Argentina  Argentina [14]
2003 United Arab Emirates  Colombia [15]
2005 Netherlands  Colombia [16]
2007 Canada  Japan [17]
2009 Egypt  Brazil [18]
2011 Colombia  Nigeria [19]
2013 Turkey  Spain [20]
2015 New Zealand  Ukraine [21]
2017 South Korea  Mexico [22]
2019 Poland  Japan [23]
2021 Indonesia

Records and statistics

Most World Cup appearances
18,  Brazil[24]
Most consecutive finals tournaments
16,  Brazil (19812011).
Most wins (players)
2, three players:
Largest win margin in one match
12 goals ( Norway 12–0  Honduras, 2019)[25]
Most goals scored in a match by a single player
9 goals (Erling Håland for  Norway against  Honduras, 2019)[25]

See also

References

  1. CBC.ca
  2. "FIFA World Youth Championship Tunisia 1977 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  3. "FIFA World Youth Championship Japan 1979 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  4. "FIFA World Youth Championship Australia 1981 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  5. "FIFA World Youth Championship Mexico 1983 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  6. "FIFA World Youth Championship USSR 1985 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  7. "FIFA World Youth Championship Chile 1987 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  8. "FIFA World Youth Championship Saudi Arabia 1989 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  9. "FIFA World Youth Championship Portugal 1991 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  10. "FIFA World Youth Championship Australia 1993 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  11. "FIFA World Youth Championship Qatar 1995 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  12. "FIFA World Youth Championship Malaysia 1997 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  13. "FIFA World Youth Championship Nigeria 1999 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  14. "FIFA World Youth Championship Argentina 2001 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  15. "FIFA World Youth Championship UAE 2003 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  16. "FIFA World Youth Championship Netherlands 2005 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  17. "FIFA U20 World Cup Canada 2007 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  18. "FIFA U20 World Cup Egypt 2009 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  19. "FIFA U-20 World Cup Colombia 2011 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  20. "FIFA U-20 World Cup Turkey 2013 – Awards". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  21. "Mali's magician Traore nets top honour". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 20 June 2015.
  22. "Solanke takes home top honour". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 11 June 2017.
  23. "Lee, Lunin headline award winners at Poland 2019". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 15 June 2019.
  24. "FIFA U-20 World Cup Final". fifa.com. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  25. "FIFA U-20 World Cup 2019: Erling Haaland scores record triple hat-trick as Norway thrash Honduras 12-0". Fox Sports Asia. 31 May 2019. Retrieved 31 May 2019.
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