Euro starter kits

Euro starter kits are packs of euro coins of all the eight denominations sealed in a plastic bag. The scope of these kits is primarily to familiarise the citizens of a nation that is going to join the eurozone with the new currency, the euro. Another objective is to fill up cash registers well in advance of €-Day. Usually these kits are available from the local banks some weeks before the euro changeover.[1]

Mainly there are two types of starter packs: business starter kits and kits for the general public. The difference is in the number of coins per pack. Business kits are intended for retailers, thereby they contain around 100 euro or more of coins and are normally contained in rolls, whereas the mini-starter kits are intended for the general public and usually have a small volume of coins.[2][3][4]

Austria

The Austrian euro starter kits were released on 15 December 2001. The general public kit was sold for €14.54 (200,07 ATS, however, rounded to 200 ATS), whereas the business starter kits were available much earlier, on 1 September 2001, and each kit contained €145,50 in Austrian euro coins. The quantity of the public and business starter kits produced was 6,000,000 and 750,000 kits, respectively.

Belgium

The Belgian starter kits were sold at 500 Belgian francs.

Cyprus

Cyprus, together with Malta, joined the eurozone on 1 January 2008. On 3 December 2007, the Central Bank of Cyprus issued mini-starter packs and business kits, so the Cypriots would have enough euro cash before €-Day.[5][6]

Forty thousand starter kits, worth €172 each, were available for businesses, but only 22.000 were sold. Since these starter kits contained rolled coins, the remaining kits could easily be used by the banks after €-day. Another 250,000 mini-kits, worth €17.09 (CYP 10) each, were available for the general public. Some 189,000 mini-kits were sold. According to the Eurobarometer survey, more than 70% of the citizens who had bought a mini-kit opened it and used the coins after the changeover, while some 20% kept it untouched. After the changeover, the unsold mini-kits were exported to satisfy the demand of coin collectors abroad. Cypriot euro coins worth €3.5 million were exported in the first three weeks of January 2008.[7]

Cypriot Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Business Starter Kit 1 roll (25 coins) 2 rolls (50 coins) 2 rolls (80 coins) 2 rolls (80 coins) 2 rolls (80 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) €172,00 03.12.2007 40,000
Public mini-Starter Kit 3 coins 5 coins 7 coins 8 coins 5 coins 6 coins 6 coins 7 coins €17,09 03.12.2007 250,000

Estonia

Estonia joined the eurozone on 1 January 2011. It was the 17th member state of the eurozone. Mini-euro starter kits were issued on 1 December 2010 and it has also issued 2 types of business kits. One business kit contains €111 worth of coins packed in rolls, whereas the other kit contains 15 rolls worth €198.[8]

Estonian Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 4 coins 5 coins 6 coins 6 coins 6 coins 6 coins 7 coins €12.79 01.12.2010 700,000
Business mini-Starter Kit 1 roll
(25 coins)
1 roll
(25 coins)
1 roll
(40 coins)
1 roll
(40 coins)
1 roll
(40 coins)
1 roll
(50 coins)
1 roll
(50 coins)
1 roll
(50 coins)
€111.00 01.12.2010 ?

Finland

Finnish Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Business Starter Kit 1 roll
(25 coins)
1 roll
(25 coins)
3 rolls
(120 coins)
2 rolls
(80 coins)
3 rolls
(120 coins)
2 rolls
(100 coins)


€168.00 01.01.2002 ?
Public mini-Starter Kit 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin 1 coin €3.88 01.01.2002 500,000

France

France was not just one of the founders of the European Union but also was one of the first countries to adopt the euro. The French euro starter packs were made available to the public on 14 December 2001. The nominal price of these packs was 100 French francs, equivalent to €15.25. The kits contained coins from the years 1999, 2000 and 2001.[9]

French Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Public mini-Starter Kit 4 coins 3 coins 4 coins 7 coins 4 coins 5 coins 7 coins 6 coins €15.25 14.12.2001 53,000,000

Germany

In Germany, each starter kit contained 20 coins for a total of €10.23, equivalent to 20.01 DEM. They were released to the public on 17 December 2001. There are five different kinds of kits, one for each mint (A, D, F, G and J). The following are the mintage quantities per mint:

  • A  : 12,100,000 Kits
  • D  : 11,600,000 Kits
  • F  : 12,100,000 Kits
  • G  : 8,100,000 Kits
  • J  : 9,600,000 Kits

Greece

The Greek kit contained coins with a total value of €14.67, or 5,000. More specifically, it contained:

  • €2.00 x 2
  • €1.00 x 5
  • €0.50 x 6
  • €0.20 x 7
  • €0.10 x 8
  • €0.05 x 6
  • €0.02 x 6
  • €0.01 x 5

Ireland

Ireland issued 750,000 starter packs on 14 December 2001. Each starter pack contained 19 coins worth €6.35 in total, or IR£5.

It contained:

  • €2.00 * 1
  • €1.00 * 2
  • €0.50 * 2
  • €0.20 * 4
  • €0.10 * 4
  • €0.05 * 2
  • €0.02 * 1
  • €0.01 * 3

Italy

Italy issued 30,000,000 starter kits. Each starter kit had a face value of €12,91, equivalent to 25,000 Italian lira. There are two variations of these packs; one has text printed on the bag, whereas the other does not.

Italian Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 4 coins 5 coins 5 coins 6 coins 10 coins 10 coins 11 coins €12.91 15.12.2001 30,000,000

Latvia

In December 2013 Latvia issued 800,000 starter kits. Each starter kit had a face value of €14,23, equivalent to 10 Latvian lats.

Latvian Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 4 coins 7 coins 8 coins 7 coins 5 coins 6 coins 6 coins €14.23 10.12.2013 800,000

Lithuania

In Lithuania, each starter kit contained 23 coins for a total of €11.59, equivalent to 40.02 LTL (rounded to 40 LTL). They were released to the public on 1 December 2014. Lithuania issued 900,000 public mini-starter kits.

Lithuanian Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Public mini-Starter Kit 3 coins 3 coins 3 coins 3 coins 3 coins 2 coins 3 coins 3 coins €11.59 01.12.2014 900,000
Business Starter Kit (First variant) 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll 1 roll €111.00 01.12.2014 60,000
Business Starter Kit (Second variant) 2 rolls 2 rolls 1 roll 2 rolls 2 rolls 1 roll 2 rolls 3 rolls €200.00 01.12.2014 50,000

Luxembourg

Except for different text on the bag and different national sides, Luxembourg's starter sets were the same as the Belgian sets, as Belgium and Luxembourg were already in a pre-existing currency union. Each set also had the equivalent of 500 francs in euro coins.

Malta

The first Maltese euro coins were made available to the public on 1 December 2007, as business starter packs worth €131 each were introduced for small businesses to fill up their cash registers with a sufficient amount of euro coins before €-day. Mini-kits each worth €11.65 were made available to the general public on 10 December 2007. Malta issued 33,000 business starter kits and 330,000 starter kits for the general public.[10][11] All the 33,000 starter kits for businesses were sold.[7]

Maltese Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Business Starter Kit 1 roll
(25 coins)
1 roll
(25 coins)
1 roll
(40 coins)
2 rolls
(80 coins)
3 rolls
(120 coins)
2 rolls
(100 coins)
2 rolls
(100 coins)
2 rolls
(100 coins)
€131.00 01.12.2007 33,000
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 3 coins 5 coins 6 coins 6 coins 5 coins 3 coins 4 coins €11.65 10.12.2007 330,000

Monaco

Despite not being a member of the European Union, in 1999 Monaco also adopted the euro. This is mainly because Monaco never had its own currency and was using the French one, so when France switched to the euro Monaco had no option but to follow suit. The European Union has a special agreement with Monaco that allows this country to mint a limited number of euro coins. Late in 2001, Monaco issued 51,200 starter kits for the nominal price of €15,25 (100 francs) each; however, today their price on commercial websites is more than €600.[3]

Netherlands

The Netherlands issued two different starter kits, intended to educate its citizens about the euro. One contained one of each coin and was distributed in a card, for free to the citizens of the Netherlands. Packaged, mint condition cards have since become collector items. Additional bags of assorted euro coins could be purchased to familiarise oneself with them. These bags contained €11.34 worth of coins and sold for 25 guilders, which was the same as the value of the coins.

Portugal

One million starter kits containing the Portuguese euro coins were made available on 17 December 2001. Each kit was sold for 2005 PTE (equivalent to €10). On 1 September 2001 business kits with €250 of euro coins were made available. The business kit included: - 50 coins of 2.00 - 50 coins of 1.00 - 120 coins of 0.50 - 120 coins of 0.20 - 80 coins of 0.10 - 100 coins of 0.05 - 100 coins of 0.02 - 100 coins of 0.01

San Marino

San Marino in 2002 was among those non-EU nations that joined the euro. Out of all the countries that switched to the euro, San Marino was the only country not to issue a euro starter kit.

Slovakia

Slovakia joined the eurozone on 1 January 2009. As part of the euro changeover preparation, Slovakia issued 1,200,000 starter packs for the general public on 1 December 2008. Each starter kit contains €16.60 in coins; this is equivalent to SKK500.09, but the price was rounded-down to SKK500. The starter kits were available for purchase in the Slovak Post branches, local commercial banks and National Bank of Slovakia.[12] Almost 90% of the Slovak starter kits were sold in the first five days.[13]

Slovak Starter Kit Content[12]
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Slovakia mini-Starter Kit 2 coins
6 coins
8 coins
8 coins
6 coins
5 coins
5 coins
5 coins
€16.60 01.12.2008 1,200,000

Slovenia

Slovenia was the first country to join the eurozone out of the 10 new member states that joined the European Union in 2004. On 1 December 2006, special starter packs of Slovenian euro coins were made available to professional cash handlers.[14] On 15 December 2006 the general public could buy euro starter kits; 450,000 of these kits were produced. Each kit contained 44 coins, amounting to €12.52 (3,000 tolars).[15]

Slovenian Starter Kits Content[16]
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Professional Cash Handlers Starter Kit 1 roll (25 coins) 3 rolls (75 coins) 2 rolls (80 coins) 2 rolls (80 coins) 3 rolls (120 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) 2 rolls (100 coins) €201.00 01.12.2006 45,000
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 4 coins 4 coins 7 coins 6 coins 6 coins 7 coins 8 coins €12.52 15.12.2006 450,000

Spain

Spain was one of the first countries to join the eurozone. The Spanish starter kits or "Monedero Euro" had a face value of €12,02, equivalent to 1999.96 pesetas; however, they were sold for 2000 pesetas. These kits were released on 15 December 2001. On 1 September 2001, special starter kits for merchants were issued. The latter had a face value of €30,41 (5060 pesetas).[17]

Spanish Starter Kits Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Business Starter Kit €30.41 01.09.2001 3,500,000
Public mini-Starter Kit 2 coins 2 coins 7 coins 7 coins 6 coins 6 coins 9 coins 4 coins €12.02 15.12.2001 23,000,000

Vatican

The Vatican City issued 1,000 starter kits on 1 March 2002. It was the only nation to issue starter kits well after the eurochangeover, thus, these starter kits became collectible items. Each kit consisted of eight coins, one coin of each denomination (€0,01 – €2,00), thereby having a face value of €3,88. Each coin has a depiction of the now late pope, John Paul II. Although these packs were available for free, nowadays, their price on commercial websites is significant. With only 1,000 issues, this is the rarest starter kit.[18]

In 2008, surprisingly, the Vatican City released 6,400 'starter kits'; however, this time the coins featured Benedict XVI. Each kit contains eight coins, again a coin of each denomination, and was given to the inhabitants and employees of the Vatican for free.[19]

Vatican Starter Kit Content
Starter Kit€2.00€1.00€0.50€0.20€0.10€0.05€0.02€0.01Face ValueIssue DateQuantity
Vatican Starter Kit 2002 1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
€3,88 01.03.2002 1,000
Vatican Starter Kit 2008 1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
1 coin
€3,88 unknown.2008 6,400

Summary

General Public Mini-Starter Kits

CountryCoins€2€1502010521Face ValueQuantity
Austria 3344236446€14.54200.07 ATS6,000,000
Belgium 2925435442€12.40500.21 BEF5,300,000
Cyprus 4735785667€17.0910 CYP250,000
Estonia 4224566667€12,79200.12 EEK700,000
Finland 811111111€3.8823.07 FIM500,000
France 4043474576€15.25100.03 FRF53,000,000
Germany 2023443211€10.2320.01 DEM53,542,150
Greece 4525678665€14.674,998.80 GRD3,000,000
Ireland 1912244213€6.355 IEP750,000
Italy 5324556101011€12.9124,997.25 ITL30,000,000
Latvia 4524787566€14.2310 LVL800,000
Lithuania 2333333233€11.5940.02 LTL900,000
Luxembourg 2925435442€12.40500.21 LUF700,000
Malta 3423566534€11.655 MTL330,000
Monaco 4043474576€15.25100.03 FRF51,200
Netherlands 811111111€3.888.55 NLG16,000,000
Netherlands 3223555534€11.3525.01 NLG8,800,000
Portugal 3422456555€10.002,004.82 PTE1,000,000
Slovakia 4526886555€16.60500.09 SKK1,200,000
Slovenia 4424476678€12.523,000.29 SIT450,000
Spain 4322776694€12.021,999.96 ESP23,000,000
Vatican 2002 811111111€3.887,512.73 ITL1,000
Vatican 2008 811111111€3.887,512.73 ITL6,400
CountryRolls€2€1502010521Face ValueQuantity
Cyprus 1512222222€172100.67 CYP40,000
Finland 12113232--€1681,040 FIM?
Malta 1411123222€13156.24 MTL33,000
Portugal 1822332222€25050,120.5 PTE?
Slovenia 1713223222€20148,167 SIT45,000
Spain 1815--2---1€30.415,060 ESP3,500,000
Lithuania 811111111€111.00383,26 LTL60,000
Lithuania 1522122123€200.00690,56 LTL50,000

References

  1. "Maltese Euro Conversion Process". Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  2. "La page n'existe plus". Jore.neuf.fr. Archived from the original on 7 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  3. "Euro Starterkits". Euromuenzen.com. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  4. "The €uro Coins Collection Network". Eurocollection.ning.com. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  5. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 March 2009. Retrieved 31 May 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. "ECB: Links". ecb.eu. Archived from the original on 19 December 2007.
  7. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2008:0204:FIN:EN:PDF
  8. "euroHOBBY". Myeurohobby.eu. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  9. "Paris rush for euro-starter kits". BBC News. 14 December 2001. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  10. "Ministry of Finance, the Economy and Investment". Euro. 1 January 1999. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  11. "ECB: Links". ecb.eu. Archived from the original on 19 January 2008. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  12. Tlačové správy Archived 18 July 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  13. "Eighth report on practical preparations for the euro: final countdown for Slovakia". Europa (web portal) (Press release). Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  14. "Euro". Evro.si. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  15. "ECB: Links". ecb.eu. Archived from the original on 12 June 2008. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  16. "Trgovska podjetja [Uvedba evra,". Multum.si. Archived from the original on 30 June 2012. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  17. "Los comerciantes españoles ya pueden retirar billetes y monedas de euro de las entidades bancarias" (Consumer Eroski, 15 Jan. 2002, in Spanish)
  18. "Shop – Homepage". Vaticanstate.va. Archived from the original on 4 July 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2011.
  19. http://www.euroswapper.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=15146&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15
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