EuroLeague

The EuroLeague, known as the Turkish Airlines EuroLeague for sponsorship reasons, is the top-tier European professional basketball club competition, organized by Euroleague Basketball since 2000.

Turkish Airlines EuroLeague
FoundedFIBA era
14 December 1957 (1957-12-14)[1]
Euroleague Basketball era
9 June 2000 (2000-06-09)[2]
First seasonFIBA era
1958
Euroleague Basketball era
2000–01
RegionEurope
ConfederationFIBA Europe
Number of teams18
Level on pyramid1
Current champions CSKA Moscow
(8th title)
Most championships Real Madrid
(10 titles)
TV partnersList of broadcasters
WebsiteOfficial website
2019–20 EuroLeague

Introduced in 2000, the competition replaced the FIBA EuroLeague (which was previously called the FIBA European Champions Cup, or simply the European Cup), which had been run by FIBA since 1958. The FIBA European Champions Cup and the EuroLeague are considered to be the same competition, with the change of name being simply a re-branding.

The EuroLeague is one of the most popular indoor sports leagues in the world, with an average attendance of 8,780 for league matches in the 2017–18 season. That was the fifth-highest of any professional indoor sports league in the world (the highest outside the United States), and the second-highest of any professional basketball league in the world, only behind the National Basketball Association (NBA).

The EuroLeague title has been won by 21 different clubs, 13 of which have won the title more than once. The most successful club in the competition is Real Madrid, with ten titles. The current champions are CSKA Moscow, who defeated Anadolu Efes in the 2019 final, winning the club's eighth title.

History

The FIBA European Champions Cup was originally established by FIBA and it operated under its umbrella from 1958 until the summer of 2000, concluding with the 1999–00 season. That was when Euroleague Basketball was created.

FIBA had never trademarked the "EuroLeague" name, even though it had used that name for the competition since 1996. Euroleague Basketball simply appropriated the name, and since FIBA had no legal recourse to do anything about it, it was forced to find a new name for its championship series. Thus, the following 2000–2001 season started with two separate top European professional club basketball competitions: the FIBA SuproLeague (previously known as the FIBA EuroLeague) and the brand new Euroleague 2000–01 season.

The rift in European professional club basketball initially showed no signs of letting up. Top clubs were also split between the two leagues: Panathinaikos, Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv, CSKA Moscow and Efes Pilsen stayed with FIBA, while Olympiacos, Kinder Bologna, Real Madrid Teka, FC Barcelona, Paf Wennington Bologna, Benetton Treviso, AEK and Tau Cerámica joined Euroleague Basketball.

In May 2001, Europe had two continental champions, Maccabi of the FIBA SuproLeague and Kinder Bologna of the Euroleague. The leaders of both organizations realized the need to come up with a unified competition. Although only a year old, Euroleague Basketball negotiated from a position of strength and dictated proceedings. FIBA essentially had no choice but to agree to Euroleague Basketball's terms. As a result, European club competition was fully integrated under Euroleague Basketball's umbrella and teams that competed in the FIBA SuproLeague during the 2000–01 season joined it as well.

In essence, the authority in European professional basketball was divided over club-country lines. FIBA stayed in charge of national team competitions (like the FIBA EuroBasket, the FIBA World Cup, and the Summer Olympics), while Euroleague Basketball took over the European professional club competitions. From that point on, FIBA's Korać Cup and Saporta Cup competitions lasted only one more season before folding, which was when Euroleague Basketball launched the ULEB Cup, now known as the EuroCup.

League era

In November 2015, Euroleague Basketball and IMG agreed on 10-year joint venture. Both Euroleague Basketball and IMG will manage the commercial operation, and the management of all global rights covering both media and marketing.[3] The deal was worth €630 million guaranteed over 10 years, with projected revenues reaching €900 million.[4] Along with the deal the league changed into a true league format, with 16 teams playing each other team in the regular season followed by the playoffs. The A-licensed club were assured of participation for the following ten years in the new format. After the new format of the EuroLeague and FIBA implementing national team windows, a conflict between the two organizations emerged. EuroLeague has been criticised by FIBA as well as several national federations for creating a 'closed league' and ignoring the principle of meritocracy. In July 2019, EuroLeague announced that from the 2019–20 season there will be no direct assess to the league through domestic leagues anymore.[5]

Title sponsorship

On 26 July 2010, Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball announced a €15 million strategic agreement to sponsor the top European basketball competition across the globe. According to the agreement, starting with the 2010–11 season, the top European competition would be named Turkish Airlines Euroleague Basketball. Similarly, the EuroLeague Final Four would be named the Turkish Airlines EuroLeague Final Four, whereby the new league title would appear in all media accordingly. This title partnership was set to run for five seasons, with the option of extending it to an additional five.[6][7] On 23 October 2013, Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball agreed to extend their partnership, up until 2020.[8]

Names of the competition

  • FIBA era: (1958–2001)
    • FIBA European Champions Cup: (1958–1991)
    • FIBA European League ("FIBA Euro League"): (1991–1996)
    • FIBA EuroLeague: (1996–2000)[9]
    • FIBA SuproLeague: (2000–2001)
  • Euroleague Basketball era: (2000–present)
    • Euroleague: (2000–2016).
    • EuroLeague: (2016–present).

*There were two separate competitions during the 2000–01 season. The SuproLeague, which was organized by FIBA, and the Euroleague, which was organized by Euroleague Basketball.

Competition systems

Tournament systems

The EuroLeague operated under a tournament system, from its inaugural 1958 season, through the 2015–16 season.

  • FIBA European Champions Cup (1958 to 1986–87): The champions of European national domestic leagues, and the then current European Champions Cup title holders (except for the 1986–87 season), competing against each other, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with either a single game final, or a 2-game aggregate score finals (3 games if needed to break a tie).
  • FIBA European Champions Cup (1987–88 to 1990–91): The champions of European national domestic leagues, competing against each other, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.
  • FIBA European League (1991–92 to 1995–96): The champions of the European national domestic leagues, the then current European League title holders, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.
  • FIBA EuroLeague (1996–97 to 1999–00): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.
  • *Euroleague (2000–01): Some of the European national domestic league champions, and some of the runners-up from various national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a best of 5 playoff finals.
  • *FIBA SuproLeague (2000–01): Some of the European national domestic league champions, and some of the runners-up from various national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.
  • Euroleague (2001–02 to 2015–16): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.

*There were two separate competitions during the 2000–01 season. The SuproLeague, which was organized by FIBA, and the Euroleague, which was organized by Euroleague Basketball.

League system

Starting with the 2016–17 season, the EuroLeague operates under a league format.

  • EuroLeague (2016–17 to present): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, playing in a true European-wide league system format. The league culminates with a Final Four.

Logos

Evolution of the EuroLeague logo
2000–2005 2005–2010 2010–2016 2016–present

Format

Starting with the 2016–17 season, the EuroLeague is made up of 16 teams, which each play each other twice, once at home and once away, in a double round robin league regular season, each team playing 30 games.

The top 8 placed teams at the end of the regular season advance to playoffs, each playing a 5 game playoff series against a single opponent. The regular season standings are used to determine which teams play each other, and in each pairing the higher placed team has home-court advantage in the series, playing 3 of the 5 games at home. The winners of each of the four playoff series advance to the Final Four, held at a predetermined site. The Final Four features two semifinals, a third place game, and the championship game, all on the same weekend.

Each team plays a maximum 37 games per season: 30 in the regular season, a maximum of 5 during the playoffs, and 2 in the Final Four.

Qualification

Currently, 11 out of the 18 EuroLeague places are held by licensed clubs that have long-term licenses with Euroleague Basketball, and are members of the Shareholders Executive Board. These eleven licensed clubs are currently:

       

The remaining 5 EuroLeague places are held by associated clubs that have annual licences. These five associated clubs are awarded through one place going to the winner of the previous season's 2nd-tier European competition, the EuroCup, with the other four places going to a combination of European national domestic league winners and wild cards.

Previous EuroLeague formats

European national domestic league and club rankings

Arena standards

Effective as of the 2012–13 season, EuroLeague clubs with what was at the time an "A License" had to host their home EuroLeague games in arenas that have a seating capacity of at least 10,000 people. This same minimum 10,000 seat arena capacity rule, now currently applies to all EuroLeague clubs with a long-term license.

Previously, in 2008, the Euroleague Basketball had originally decided to increase the minimum arena seating requirement to 10,000, within four years time, in order to force EuroLeague clubs to move into and/or build bigger arenas. This was done in hopes of increasing revenues through more ticket sales. Conversely, associated clubs, must currently play in arenas that seat at least 5,000 people.

Current clubs

These are the teams that participate in the 2019–20 EuroLeague season:

Team Home city Arena Capacity
ALBA Berlin Berlin Mercedes-Benz Arena 14,500[10]
Anadolu Efes Istanbul Sinan Erdem Dome 16,000[11]
A|X Armani Exchange Milan Milan Mediolanum Forum 12,700[12]
Allianz Cloud 5,420
Barcelona Barcelona Palau Blaugrana 7,585[13]
Bayern Munich Munich Audi Dome 6,700[14]
Crvena zvezda mts Belgrade Štark Arena 18,386[15]
Aleksandar Nikolić Hall 8,000[16]
CSKA Moscow Moscow Megasport Arena 13,344[17]
Fenerbahçe Beko Istanbul Ülker Sports and Event Hall 13,059[18]
Khimki Khimki Mytishchi Arena 7,280
Kirolbet Baskonia Vitoria-Gasteiz Buesa Arena 15,504[19]
LDLC ASVEL Villeurbanne Astroballe 5,556[20]
Maccabi FOX Tel Aviv Tel Aviv Menora Mivtachim Arena 10,383[21]
Olympiacos Piraeus Peace and Friendship Stadium 11,640[22]
Panathinaikos OPAP Athens O.A.K.A. 18,989[23]
Real Madrid Madrid WiZink Center 15,000[24]
Valencia Basket Valencia La Fonteta 9,000[25]
Žalgiris Kaunas Žalgirio Arena 15,415[26]
Zenit Saint Petersburg Saint Petersburg Sibur Arena 7,120[27]

Results

Finals

Year Finalists Semifinalists
Champion Score Runner-up Third place Fourth place
1958
Details

Rīgas ASK
170–152
(86–81 / 71–84)

Academic
Real Madrid and Budapesti Honvéd
1958–59
Details

Rīgas ASK
148–125
(79–58 / 67–69)

Academic
Lech Poznań OKK Beograd
1959–60
Details

Rīgas ASK
130–113
(51–61 / 69–62)

Dinamo Tbilisi
Slovan Orbis Praha and Polonia Warszawa
1960–61
Details

CSKA Moscow
148–128
(87–62 / 66–61)

Rīgas ASK
CCA București and Real Madrid
1961–62
Details

Dinamo Tbilisi
90–83
Real Madrid
CSKA Moscow and AŠK Olimpija
1962–63
Details

CSKA Moscow
259–240
(86–69 / 91–74 / 99–80)

Real Madrid
Dinamo Tbilisi and Spartak ZJŠ Brno
1963–64
Details

Real Madrid
183–174
(110–99 / 84–64)

Spartak ZJŠ Brno
Simmenthal Milano and OKK Beograd
1964–65
Details

Real Madrid
157–150
(88–81 / 76–62)

CSKA Moscow
OKK Beograd and Ignis Varese
1965–66
Details

Simmenthal Milano
77–72
Slavia VŠ Praha

CSKA Moscow

AEK
1966–67
Details

Real Madrid
91–83
Simmenthal Milano

AŠK Olimpija

Slavia VŠ Praha
1967–68
Details

Real Madrid
98–95
Spartak ZJŠ Brno
Zadar and Simmenthal Milano
1968–69
Details

CSKA Moscow
103–99 (2 OT's)
Real Madrid
Spartak ZJŠ Brno and Standard Liège
1969–70
Details

Ignis Varese
79–74
CSKA Moscow
Real Madrid and Slavia VŠ Praha
1970–71
Details

CSKA Moscow
67–53
Ignis Varese
Slavia VŠ Praha and Real Madrid
1971–72
Details

Ignis Varese
70–69
Jugoplastika
Panathinaikos and Real Madrid
1972–73
Details

Ignis Varese
71–66
CSKA Moscow
Simmenthal Milano and Crvena zvezda
1973–74
Details

Real Madrid
84–82
Ignis Varese
Berck and Radnički Belgrade
1974–75
Details

Ignis Varese
79–66
Real Madrid
Berck and Zadar
1975–76
Details

Mobilgirgi Varese
81–74
Real Madrid
Birra Forst Cantù and ASVEL
1976–77
Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
78–77
Mobilgirgi Varese

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid
1977–78
Details

Real Madrid
75–67
Mobilgirgi Varese

ASVEL

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
1978–79
Details

Bosna
75–67
Emerson Varese

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Real Madrid
1979–80
Details

Real Madrid
89–85
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Bosna

Sinudyne Bologna
1980–81
Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
80–79
Sinudyne Bologna

Nashua EBBC

Bosna
1981–82
Details

Squibb Cantù
86–80
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Partizan

Barcelona
1982–83
Details

Ford Cantù
69–68
Billy Milano

Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow
1983–84
Details

Banco di Roma Virtus
79–73
Barcelona

Jollycolombani Cantù

Bosna
1984–85
Details

Cibona
87–78
Real Madrid

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

CSKA Moscow
1985–86
Details

Cibona
94–82
Žalgiris

Simac Milano

Real Madrid
1986–87
Details

Tracer Milano
71–69
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Orthez

Zadar
1987–88
Details

Tracer Milano
90–84
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Partizan

Aris
1988–89
Details

Jugoplastika
75–69
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Aris

Barcelona
1989–90
Details

Jugoplastika
72–67
Barcelona Banca Catalana

Limoges CSP

Aris
1990–91
Details

Pop 84
70–65
Barcelona Banca Catalana

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Scavolini Pesaro
1991–92
Details

Partizan
71–70
Montigalà Joventut

Philips Milano

Estudiantes Caja Postal
1992–93
Details

Limoges CSP
59–55
Benetton Treviso

PAOK

Real Madrid Teka
1993–94
Details

7up Joventut
59–57
Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

Barcelona Banca Catalana
1994–95
Details

Real Madrid Teka
73–61
Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

Limoges CSP
1995–96
Details

Panathinaikos
67–66
Barcelona Banca Catalana

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid Teka
1996–97
Details

Olympiacos
73–58
Barcelona Banca Catalana

Smelt Olimpija

ASVEL
1997–98
Details

Kinder Bologna
58–44
AEK

Benetton Treviso

Partizan
1998–99
Details

Žalgiris
82–74
Kinder Bologna

Olympiacos

Teamsystem Bologna
1999–00
Details

Panathinaikos
73–67
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Efes Pilsen

Barcelona
2000–01
Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
81–67
Panathinaikos

Efes Pilsen

CSKA Moscow
2000–01
Details

Kinder Bologna
3–2
play-off

Tau Cerámica
Paf Wennington Bologna and AEK
2001–02
Details

Panathinaikos
89–83
Kinder Bologna
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv and Benetton Treviso
2002–03
Details

Barcelona
76–65
Benetton Treviso

Montepaschi Siena

CSKA Moscow
2003–04
Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
118–74
Skipper Bologna

CSKA Moscow

Montepaschi Siena
2004–05
Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv
90–78
Tau Cerámica

Panathinaikos

CSKA Moscow
2005–06
Details

CSKA Moscow
73–69
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Tau Cerámica

Winterthur Barcelona
2006–07
Details

Panathinaikos
93–91
CSKA Moscow

Unicaja

Tau Cerámica
2007–08
Details

CSKA Moscow
91–77
Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Montepaschi Siena

Tau Cerámica
2008–09
Details

Panathinaikos
73–71
CSKA Moscow

Regal Barcelona

Olympiacos
2009–10
Details

Regal Barcelona
86–68
Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Partizan
2010–11
Details

Panathinaikos
78–70
Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv

Montepaschi Siena

Real Madrid
2011–12
Details

Olympiacos
62–61
CSKA Moscow

Barcelona Regal

Panathinaikos
2012–13
Details

Olympiacos
100–88
Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow

Barcelona Regal
2013–14
Details

Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv
98–86 (OT)
Real Madrid

Barcelona

CSKA Moscow
2014–15
Details

Real Madrid
78–59
Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Fenerbahçe Ülker
2015–16
Details

CSKA Moscow
101–96 (OT)
Fenerbahçe

Lokomotiv Kuban

Laboral Kutxa
2016–17
Details

Fenerbahçe
80–64
Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid
2017–18
Details

Real Madrid
85–80
Fenerbahçe Doğuş

Žalgiris

CSKA Moscow
2018–19
Details

CSKA Moscow
91–83
Anadolu Efes

Real Madrid

Fenerbahçe Beko

Titles by club

Rank Club Titles Runner-up Champion years
1 Real Madrid 10 8 1963–64, 1964–65, 1966–67, 1967–68, 1973–74, 1977–78, 1979–80, 1994–95, 2014–15, 2017–18
2 CSKA Moscow 8 6 1960–61, 1962–63, 1968–69, 1970–71, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2015–16, 2018–19
3 Maccabi Tel Aviv 6 9 1976–77, 1980–81, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2013–14
4 Panathinaikos 6 1 1995–96, 1999–00, 2001–02, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2010–11
5 Varese 5 5 1969–70, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1974–75, 1975–76
6 Olympiacos 3 5 1996–97, 2011–12, 2012–13
7 Olimpia Milano 3 2 1965–66, 1986–87, 1987–88
8 Rīgas ASK 3 1 1958, 1958–59, 1959–60
Split 3 1 1988–89, 1989–90, 1990–91
10 Barcelona 2 5 2002–03, 2009–10
11 Virtus Bologna 2 3 1997–98, 2000–01
12 Cantù 2 1981–82, 1982–83
Cibona 2 1984–85, 1985–86
14 Fenerbahçe 1 2 2016–17
15 Dinamo Tbilisi 1 1 1961–62
Joventut 1 1 1993–94
Žalgiris 1 1 1998–99
18 Bosna 1 1978–79
Virtus Roma 1 1983–84
Partizan 1 1991–92
Limoges CSP 1 1992–93
22 Academic 2
Brno 2
Treviso 2
Baskonia 2
26 USK Praha 1
AEK 1
Fortitudo Bologna 1
Anadolu Efes 1

Titles by nation

Rank Country Club Titles Runners-up
1. Spain Real Madrid 10 8
Barcelona 2 5
Joventut 1 1
Baskonia 2
4 clubs 13 16
2. Italy
Varese 5 5
Olimpia Milano 3 2
Virtus Bologna 2 3
Cantù 2
Virtus Roma 1
Treviso 2
Fortitudo Bologna 1
7 clubs 13 13
3. Greece Panathinaikos 6 1
Olympiacos 3 5
AEK 1
3 clubs 9 7
4. Soviet Union CSKA Moscow 4 3
Rīgas ASK 3 1
Dinamo Tbilisi 1 1
Žalgiris - 1
4 clubs 8 6
5. Yugoslavia Split 3 1
Cibona 2
Bosna 1
Partizan 1
4 clubs 7 1
6. Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv 6 9
7. Russia CSKA Moscow 4 3
8. Turkey Fenerbahçe 1 2
Anadolu Efes 1
2 clubs 1 3
9. France Limoges CSP 1
Lithuania Žalgiris 1
11. Czechoslovakia Brno 2
USK Praha 1
2 clubs 0 3
12. Bulgaria Academic 2

Records

EuroLeague awards

Statistical leaders

All-time leaders

Since the beginning of the 2000–01 season (Euroleague Basketball era):

Average Accumulated
Points Alphonso Ford22.22 Juan Carlos Navarro4,152
Rebounds Joseph Blair10.05 Felipe Reyes1,782
Assists Nick Calathes5.65 Vassilis Spanoulis1,446
Steals Manu Ginóbili2.73 Dimitris Diamantidis434
Blocks Grigorij Khizhnyak3.19 Fran Vázquez249
Index Rating Anthony Parker21.41 Juan Carlos Navarro3,890

Individual performances

EuroLeague versus NBA games

Attendances

Season averages

All averages include playoffs and Final Four games.

SeasonTotal gateGamesAverageChangeHigh avg.TeamLow avg.Team
2009–101,182,0461866,35511,188 Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv1,440 Fenerbahçe Ülker
2010–111,383,4491857,478+17.7%13,926 Fenerbahçe Ülker3,180 Khimki
2011–121,305,2151787,333–1.9%13,107 Žalgiris3,283 Asseco Prokom
2012–131,867,1452537,366+0.5%13,425 Žalgiris3,110 Asseco Prokom
2013–142,063,6002488,130+10.4%12,578 Partizan NIS3,960 Budivelnyk
2014–152,013,3052518,184+0.1%14,483 Crvena Zvezda Telekom1,949 PGE Turów
2015–161,832,9202507,332–10.4%11,060 Maccabi FOX Tel Aviv2,809 Khimki
2016–172,194,2382598,472+5.4%11,633 Baskonia3,734 UNICS
2017–182,282,2972608,780+3.6%13,560 Žalgiris3,900 Anadolu Efes
2018–192,153,4452608,282–6.0%14,808 Žalgiris2,691 Darüşşafaka Tekfen

Historic average attendances

This list shows the averages attendances of each team since the 16-team regular season was established in 2016. All averages include playoffs games.

Season EFS BAM BAR BKN BAY BUD CZV CSK DSK FNB GAL GCA KHI MTA MGA MIL OLY PAO RMA UNK VAL ZAL
2016–175,3206,4154,93111,6339,8188,2934,67711,2194,80610,8889,4839,36011,17210,3123,73411,418
2017–183,9006,1885,67911,3516,2778,21111,5666,02210,7317,2727,4728,91313,00510,0306,75313,560
2018–198,2475,79311,1384,3494,7927,1982,69110,7374,8235,50210,5228,4938,20312,5309,79214,808

Individual game highest attendance

Rank Home team Score Away team Attendance Arena Date Ref
1 Partizan63–56 Panathinaikos22,567Belgrade ArenaMarch 5, 2009
2 Partizan76–67 Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv21,367Belgrade ArenaApril 1, 2010
3 Partizan81–73 Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv20,783Belgrade ArenaMarch 30, 2010

Media coverage

The EuroLeague season is broadcast on television, and can be seen in up to 201 countries and territories.[32] It can be seen by up to 245 million (800 million via satellite) households weekly in China.[33]

It is also televised in the United States and Canada on NBA TV and available online through ESPN3 (in English) and ESPN Deportes (in Spanish) until 2017–18 season. From 2018–19 season, the coverage is moved to FloSports.[34]

The EuroLeague Final Four is broadcast on television in up to 213 countries and territories.[35] The EuroLeague also has its own internet pay TV service, called EuroLeague TV.

Sponsors

Title sponsor
Premium partners
  • 7DAYS
  • Adidas
  • Tempobet (only in Germany)
  • FONBET (only in Russia)
  • Nesine (only in Turkey)
  • bwin (Greece&Spain)

Source:[36][37][38][39][40][41]

See also

References

  1. "Champions Cup 1958". linguasprt. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  2. "ULEB History". ULEB. Retrieved 2 January 2017.
  3. "Euroleague Basketball A-licence clubs and IMG agree on 10-year joint venture". Euroleague Basketball. 10 November 2015.
  4. 630 millions guaranteed by IMG.
  5. "The EuroLeague changes in the summer of 2020". Eurohoops. 11 July 2019. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  6. "Turkish Airlines And Euroleague Basketball Sign Strategic Partnership Agreememt" (Press release). Euroleague Basketball. 28 July 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  7. "An important strategic partnership agreement between Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball..." (Press release). Turkish Airlines. 26 July 2010. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  8. "Turkish Airlines, Euroleague Basketball Cement Partnership Through 2020". turkishairlines.com. 23 October 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2015.
  9. THE EUROPEAN CUP FOR MEN'S CHAMPION CLUBS - THE EARLY YEARS
  10. Worldstadiums.com basketball capacity 14,500. Archived 6 October 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  11. Turkey2010.FIBA.com Mayor of Istanbul gives Turkish Basketball Federation and media tour of World Championship Final venue. Archived 2010-06-10 at the Wayback Machine
  12. "CHI SIAMO". MediolanumForum.it. Retrieved 3 December 2016.
  13. "Palau Blaugrana - FC Barcelona". FC Barcelona. Retrieved 4 June 2017.
  14. Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle Archived 2011-06-24 at the Wayback Machine (in German)
  15. (in Russian)
  16. "Hala Aleksandar Nikolić". tasmajdan.rs. Retrieved 4 January 2019.
  17. About Megasport (in Russian)
  18. Venue Review: Fenerbahce Ulker Sports Arena.
  19. "Sports Competitions". buesa-arena.com. Archived from the original on 7 November 2016. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  20. "0 ME,Astroballe (5556 places)" (in French). Archived from the original on 30 June 2017. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  21. Attendance: 10,383.
  22. "Peace and Friendship Stadium - Olympiacos BC". olympiacosbc.gr. Retrieved 4 June 2017.
  23. "Olympic Sports Hall". stadia.gr. Retrieved 29 June 2017.
  24. "WiZink Center | Real Madrid Basketball Arena | Real Madrid Basketball". Real Madrid. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  25. Pabellón: Pabellon Municipal Fuente San Luis (9.000 espectadores) (in Spanish).
  26. "EuroLeague ticket sales to Zalgiris home games begin next week". Retrieved 8 September 2019.
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  31. European club champions: 1958-2014.
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  35. Record broadcast reach for 2017 Final Four!
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