Ethyl octanoate

Ethyl octanoate, also known as ethyl caprylate, is a fatty acid ester formed from caprylic acid and ethanol. It has the semi-developed formula of CH3(CH2)6COOCH2CH3, and is used in food industries as a flavoring and in the perfume industry as a scent additive. It is present in many fruits and alcoholic beverages, and has a strong odor of fruit and flowers. It is used in the creation of synthetic fruity scents.[5]

Ethyl octanoate
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Ethyl octanoate
Other names
Ethyl caprylate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.078
EC Number
RTECS number
  • RH0680000
UNII
Properties
C10H20O2
Molar mass 172.268 g·mol−1
Density 0.86215 g/cm3[1]
Melting point −48 °C (−54 °F; 225 K)[2]
Boiling point 208 °C (406 °F; 481 K)[2]
70.1 mg/L [3][4]
Vapor pressure 0.2 mbar at 20°C; 3.18 mbar at 60°C [2]
Viscosity 1.411 mPa·s[1]
Hazards
Flash point 79°C [2]
325°C [2]
Explosive limits 0.7 - Vol.% [2]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
25.96 g/kg (rat, oral) [3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

References

  1. Sheu, Yaw-Wen; Tu, Chein-Hsiun (2006). "Densities and Viscosities of Binary Mixtures of Isoamyl Acetate, Ethyl Caproate, Ethyl Benzoate, Isoamyl Butyrate, Ethyl Phenylacetate, and Ethyl Caprylate with Ethanol at T = (288.15, 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K". Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data. 51 (2): 496–503. doi:10.1021/je050389b.
  2. Record of Ethyl octanoate in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, accessed on 10 August 2010.
  3. Ethyl caprylate in the ChemIDplus database, accessed 10 August 2010
  4. Mark, James E. (2007). Physical Properties of Polymer Handbook (2nd ed.). Springer. p. 294. ISBN 0387690026. Retrieved 1 March 2013.
  5. Fahlbusch, Karl-Georg; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef; Panten, Johannes; Pickenhagen, Wilhelm; Schatkowski, Dietmar; Bauer, Kurt; Garbe, Dorothea; Surburg, Horst (15 January 2003). Flavors and Flagrances. Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. doi:10.1002/14356007.a11_141.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.