East Suffolk Militia

The East Suffolk Militia was one of two regiments of militia raised in Suffolk. Formed in 1759 it was converted in 1853 to an Artillery Militia unit, which was eventually disbanded in 1909.

East Suffolk Militia
Suffolk Artillery Militia
Active1759–1909
Country Kingdom of Great Britain (1759–1800)
 United Kingdom (1801–1909)
Branch British Army
TypeInfantry
Artillery (after 1853)
Garrison/HQIpswich (after 1853)
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Robert Adair, 1st Baron Waveney (first commanding officer)

History

The Militia Act of 1757 established militia regiments for each county and required each parish to provide a number of able-bodied men, aged between 18 and 50 (reduced to 45 in 1762) for military training. Militia regiments served in Britain or Ireland but not overseas. Men had to serve for three years (for five years after 1786). As well as the East Suffolk Militia, the county also raised the West Suffolk Militia.[1] In 1831 the East Suffolk Militia became the East Suffolk Light Infantry Militia.

In May 1853 the Militia was reorganised with the East Suffolk being converted into an Artillery unit.[2] The Corps of Artillery was designated The Suffolk Artillery Militia and had its headquarters at Ipswich. The unit had a purpose built artillery barracks in Ipswich which were completed in 1855.[3] The first commanding officer was Colonel Robert A Shafto Adair MP, who later became Robert Adair, 1st Baron Waveney.

The unit was embodied during the Crimean War (1855-6), the Indian Mutiny (1859-1860) and during the South African War (1900) but never served overseas. The unit was redesignated as The Suffolk Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia) in 1902. It was transferred to the Special Reserve Royal Field Artillery in 1908 on the formation of the Territorial Force and disbanded the following year.

References

    • Litchfield, Norman E H, 1987. The Militia Artillery 1852-1909, The Sherwood Press, Nottingham, p.130
    • Litchfield, Norman E H, 1987. The Militia Artillery 1852-1909, The Sherwood Press, Nottingham, p.130
  1. New Artillery Militia Barracks, Illustrated London News, 17 February 1855

Bibliography

  • Beckett, Ian F W (2011). Britain's Part Time Soldiers. The Amateur Military Tradition 1558—1945 (2 ed.). Barnsley: Pen & Sword. ISBN 9781848843950.
  • Hay, George Jackson (Colonel) (1987) [1908]. An Epitomized History of the Militia (The "Constitutional Force"). Ray Westlake Military Books. ISBN 0-9508530-7-0.
  • Litchfield, Norman E H, 1987. The Militia Artillery 1852-1909, The Sherwood Press, Nottingham. ISBN 0-9508205-1-2
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