Dauphin, Manitoba

Dauphin (French for "heir to the French throne", see Dauphin of France) is a city in Manitoba, Canada, with a population of 8,457 as of the 2016 Canadian Census, with an additional 2,388 living in the surrounding Rural Municipality of Dauphin, for a total of 10,845 in the RM and City combined.[2] Dauphin is Manitoba's 9th largest community and serves as a hub to the province's Parkland Region.[3] The current mayor of Dauphin is Allen Dowhan. Conservative Robert Sopuck has been the member of Parliament for the Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette riding since November 2010. Progressive Conservative Brad Michaleski is the current member of the Legislative Assembly. Dauphin plays host to several summer festivals, including Dauphin's Countryfest and Canada's National Ukrainian Festival. Dauphin is known as the "Garden Capital of Manitoba." Dauphin is served by Provincial Trunk Highways 5, 10 and 20 and is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Dauphin.

Dauphin
City of Dauphin
The Watson Arts Centre was built in 1905 to house the town hall, fire station and RCMP detachment.

Seal

Nickname(s): 
City of Sunshine
Motto(s): 
"Everything You Deserve"
Dauphin
Location of Dauphin in Manitoba
Coordinates: 51°08′58″N 100°02′58″W
CountryCanada
ProvinceManitoba
RegionParkland
Established1898
Government
  City MayorAllen Dowhan
  Governing BodyDauphin City Council
  MP (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa)Robert Sopuck
  MLA (Dauphin)Brad Michaleski
Area
  Total12.68 km2 (4.90 sq mi)
Elevation
268 m (968 ft)
Population
 (2016)
  Total8,457[1]
  Change 2011-16
2.5%
Time zoneUTC−6 (CST)
  Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Forward sortation area
R7N
WebsiteCity of Dauphin

Location

Dauphin is in western Manitoba near Duck Mountain Provincial Park and Riding Mountain National Park, just west of Lake Manitoba and Dauphin Lake and south of Lake Winnipegosis.

History

The nearby lake was given the name "Dauphin" by the explorer Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye in 1741 in honour of the heir to the French throne.[4] Settlers began arriving in the area in 1883 and two early settlements, Gartmore and "Old Dauphin" were established.[5] With the coming of the railway in 1896 the line ran roughly halfway between the two villages settlement shifted to the present site. This coincided with the beginning of Ukrainian settlement in the area: previously most arrivals had been of British extraction.

Dauphin was granted a village charter on July 11, 1898, with George Barker as first mayor.[6] In 1901 Dauphin was incorporated as a town, with George King as mayor.[7] Dauphin became an important centre for the transportation of grain. Farming still plays a central role in the economy of the area, but its role has been greatly reduced.

From 1974-1979, a federally funded pilot project called Mincome provided a Basic income guarantee to residents of Dauphin.[8]

Dauphin was incorporated as a city in 1998.

Healthcare

Dauphin is a regional healthcare hub, part of the Prairie Mountain Health authority. The Dauphin General Hospital (now the Dauphin Regional Health Centre) was established in 1901. The Dauphin Medical Clinic provides access to family physicians and specialists, while providing a walk-in clinic and acute care.

Economy

As the largest city within the Parkland, Dauphin has a trading area of over 50,000 people.[9] A large part of Dauphin's economy is based on agriculture, with farms in this area of the province producing grains, oilseeds, honey and livestock. Dauphin is the home to various industries including manufacturing, health care, education, recreation/tourism and retail.[10] The Canadian distribution centre for Norwex is also located in the city.[11]

Education

The first school building was erected in Dauphin in 1903, a frame building on the present Mackenzie School site.[12] The original Whitmore School was built on Fifth Ave. SW in 1907, followed by the Smith-Jackson School on Main Street South in 1922.[13] Today, the Mountain View School Division oversees K-12 education in Dauphin. The City of Dauphin has 7 schools including the Dauphin Regional Comprehensive Secondary School, Mackenzie Middle School, Henderson Elementary School, Lt. Colonel Barker VC School, École Macneill (French Immersion), Whitmore School and Smith-Jackson Ukrainian Bilingual School.[14] The Assiniboine Community College Parkland Campus, located in Dauphin, provides post-secondary programming in the Parkland. Programs include business, agriculture, applied counseling, nursing and a range of apprenticeship courses.[15]

Transportation

Ground

The city is served by Manitoba Provincial Trunk Highways:

Air

Lt. Col W.G. (Billy) Barker VC Airport serves the area, however no scheduled flights are operated from the airport.

Rail

Dauphin railway station is served by Via Rail's Winnipeg–Churchill train. The rail line is owned by Canadian National (CN) which also operates freight trains through the town.

Sports

Dauphin is a hockey community. The Credit Union Place recreation complex was built in 2006. It is the home of the Dauphin Kings, an MJHL Junior A hockey team, Turnbull Memorial Trophy winners in 1969, 1970, 1972, 1977, 1983, 1993, and 2010 and Anavet Cup winners of 2010. Formerly, the team played in the Dauphin Memorial Community Centre (D.M.C.C.) arena that was built after the Second World War. Dauphin and the Kings hosted the Royal Bank Cup in 2010, the Canadian National Championship for Junior A Hockey. The 1953-54 Dauphin Kings were inducted into the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame for winning the team's second Western Canadian Intermediate Championship in a decade and capturing the Edmonton Journal trophy.

Dauphin has a history of title-winning baseball teams. Both the Dauphin Redbirds and later the Dauphin Brewers have claimed numerous provincial titles.

Dauphin high schoolers play a big part of the athletics of Dauphin. They have won many awards and medals in volleyball, track and field, basketball, broomball, curling, football, and hockey.

A Dauphin rink composed of curlers Ab Gowanlock, Jim Williams, Art Pollon and Russ Jackman won the Brier, the Canadian men's curling championship, in 1953.

Dauphin has been called the "horseshoe capital of Canada,"[16] in large part due to the efforts of Bert Snart (1912-1988), president of the Dauphin Horseshoe Club for 32 years. In 1976 he was inducted into the Horseshoe Hall of Fame in Levittown, PA.

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
19011,135    
19112,815+148.0%
19213,885+38.0%
19313,971+2.2%
19414,662+17.4%
19516,007+28.9%
19617,374+22.8%
19968,266+12.1%
20018,085−2.2%
20067,906−2.2%
20118,251+4.4%
20168,457+2.5%
[17][18][19]

The City of Dauphin had a population of 8,457 in 2016, while there were an additional 2,388 residents living in the surrounding Rural Municipality of Dauphin.[20] Dauphin had a population of 8,251 people in 2011, an increase of 4.4% from the 2006 census. The median household income in 2005 was $35,527, below the Manitoba provincial average of $47,875.[21] According to the 1996 Canadian census, Ukrainians constitute the largest ethnic group in the City of Dauphin, with 41.04% of the population. Almost 26% of the population can speak Ukrainian. 24.17% of the residents have English ancestry, 17.61% Scottish ancestry, and 12.3% Irish ancestry, and approximately 10% are of Aboriginal origin.[22]

Canada 2006 CensusPopulation% of Total Population
Visible minority group
Source:[23]
South Asian00%
Chinese00%
Black150.2%
Filipino350.5%
Latin American100.1%
Arab150%
Southeast Asian00%
West Asian00%
Korean00%
Japanese00%
Mixed visible minority100.1%
Total visible minority population751%
Aboriginal group
Source:[24]
First Nations3704.8%
Métis1,10014.2%
Inuit00%
Total Aboriginal population1,50519.4%
White6,16079.6%
Total population7,740100%

Climate

Dauphin has a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb) with cold winters and warm summers. The highest temperature ever recorded in Dauphin was 40.6 °C (105 °F) on 28 June 1931.[25] The coldest temperature ever recorded was −44.4 °C (−48 °F) on 25 February 1890 and 18 February 1966.[26][27]

Climate data for Dauphin Airport, 1981−2010 normals, extremes 1890−present[lower-alpha 1]
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 9.6
(49.3)
13.9
(57.0)
24.2
(75.6)
35.2
(95.4)
39.2
(102.6)
40.6
(105.1)
40.0
(104.0)
39.0
(102.2)
37.8
(100.0)
31.1
(88.0)
23.3
(73.9)
13.9
(57.0)
40.6
(105.1)
Average high °C (°F) −10.0
(14.0)
−7.1
(19.2)
−0.5
(31.1)
10.1
(50.2)
17.6
(63.7)
22.1
(71.8)
25.2
(77.4)
24.6
(76.3)
18.1
(64.6)
10.1
(50.2)
−0.6
(30.9)
−8.0
(17.6)
8.5
(47.3)
Daily mean °C (°F) −15.4
(4.3)
−12.6
(9.3)
−6.1
(21.0)
3.6
(38.5)
10.5
(50.9)
15.7
(60.3)
18.7
(65.7)
17.7
(63.9)
11.7
(53.1)
4.4
(39.9)
−5.3
(22.5)
−13.1
(8.4)
2.5
(36.5)
Average low °C (°F) −20.7
(−5.3)
−18.0
(−0.4)
−11.6
(11.1)
−2.9
(26.8)
3.4
(38.1)
9.2
(48.6)
12.1
(53.8)
10.6
(51.1)
5.2
(41.4)
−1.4
(29.5)
−10.0
(14.0)
−18.1
(−0.6)
−3.5
(25.7)
Record low °C (°F) −43.3
(−45.9)
−44.4
(−47.9)
−39.0
(−38.2)
−27.8
(−18.0)
−15.4
(4.3)
−6.1
(21.0)
0.6
(33.1)
−1.1
(30.0)
−9.7
(14.5)
−21.7
(−7.1)
−34.5
(−30.1)
−41.1
(−42.0)
−44.4
(−47.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 13.7
(0.54)
10.7
(0.42)
24.0
(0.94)
29.6
(1.17)
54.9
(2.16)
82.0
(3.23)
73.1
(2.88)
61.3
(2.41)
58.2
(2.29)
35.2
(1.39)
20.8
(0.82)
18.6
(0.73)
481.9
(18.97)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 0.4
(0.02)
0.3
(0.01)
5.5
(0.22)
17.1
(0.67)
52.9
(2.08)
81.7
(3.22)
73.1
(2.88)
61.3
(2.41)
57.2
(2.25)
29.4
(1.16)
4.5
(0.18)
0.6
(0.02)
383.7
(15.11)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 16.6
(6.5)
14.3
(5.6)
20.2
(8.0)
12.9
(5.1)
3.3
(1.3)
0.3
(0.1)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
1.0
(0.4)
6.0
(2.4)
17.9
(7.0)
21.3
(8.4)
113.7
(44.8)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 11.4 8.7 9.7 8.4 11.1 14.4 12.5 11.2 11.8 9.5 8.7 11.3 128.5
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 0.65 0.58 2.5 5.5 10.7 14.4 12.5 11.2 11.7 7.9 2.0 0.50 80.1
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 11.4 7.7 7.4 3.2 0.75 0.05 0.0 0.0 0.25 2.8 7.4 11.1 52.0
Mean monthly sunshine hours 113.1 132.5 167.2 219.0 260.9 263.7 301.8 274.2 171.0 140.0 92.7 94.9 2,230.9
Percent possible sunshine 43.2 47.2 45.5 52.9 54.2 53.4 60.6 60.7 44.9 42.1 34.4 38.3 48.1
Source: Environment Canada[27][28][26][29][25][30][31][32]

Local media

Newspapers

  • Dauphin Herald

Radio

Television

Dauphin was formerly served by a local newscast, which aired on the city's now-defunct retransmitter of CBWT Winnipeg but was produced by Craig Media instead of by CBC Television.[33]

OTA channel Call Sign Network Notes
2 (VHF) CKND-TV-2 Global Rebroadcaster of CKND-DT (Winnipeg)
12 (VHF) CKYD-TV CTV Rebroadcaster of CKY-DT (Winnipeg)
27 (UHF) CHMI-TV-3 City Rebroadcaster of CHMI-DT (Winnipeg)

Notable people

References

  1. http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=4617050&Geo2=CD&Code2=4617&Data=Count&SearchText=dauphin&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&TABID=1
  2. http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=4617048&Geo2=CD&Code2=4617&Data=Count&SearchText=dauphin&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&TABID=1
  3. http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/hlt-fst/pd-pl/Table-Tableau.cfm?LANG=Eng&T=302&SR=1&S=51&O=A&RPP=9999&PR=46&CMA=0
  4. Harris, Carolyn (Aug 2017). "The Queen's land". Canada's History. 97 (4): 34–43. ISSN 1920-9894.
  5. Maynard, Elgin et al. Dauphin Valley Spans the Years. Dauphin Historical Society, 1970.
  6. Dauphin Manitoba Sixtieth Anniversary Celebration - Historical Booklet Published by the Dauphin Chamber of Commerce, 1958
  7. Dauphin Manitoba Sixtieth Anniversary Celebration - Historical Booklet Published by the Dauphin Chamber of Commerce, 1958
  8. Lum, Zi-Ann (December 23, 2014). "A Canadian City Once Eliminated Poverty And Nearly Everyone Forgot About It". The Huffington Post. Retrieved December 9, 2015.
  9. http://www.sayyestodauphin.ca/economic-development
  10. http://parklandmanitoba.ca/about-parc/communities/dauphin-rm
  11. http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/dauphins-clean-team-aims-for-billion-dollar-sales-104625164.html
  12. Dauphin Manitoba Sixtieth Anniversary Celebration - Historical Booklet Published by the Dauphin Chamber of Commerce, 1958
  13. Dauphin Manitoba Sixtieth Anniversary Celebration - Historical Booklet Published by the Dauphin Chamber of Commerce, 1958
  14. http://www.mvsd.ca/
  15. http://assiniboine.net/location/12/parkland-campus/location-details
  16. http://honouredmembers.sportmanitoba.ca/inductee.php?id=43&criteria_sort=name
  17. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-10-19. Retrieved 2014-08-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Censuses 1871-1931
  18. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-12-09. Retrieved 2014-08-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Census 1941-1951
  19. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-12-23. Retrieved 2014-08-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Census 1961
  20. https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=4617050&Geo2=CD&Code2=4617&Data=Count&SearchText=dauphin&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&TABID=1
  21. "Dauphin, Manitoba - Detailed City Profile". Retrieved 2009-09-10.
  22. "Statistics Canada 1996". Archived from the original on 2006-10-07. Retrieved 2007-03-23.
  23. , Community Profiles from the 2006 Census, Statistics Canada - Census Subdivision
  24. , Aboriginal Peoples - Data table
  25. "Daily Data Report for June 1931". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  26. "Daily Data Report for February 1890". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  27. "Dauphin A, Manitoba". Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  28. "Dauphin A, Manitoba". Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Retrieved October 23, 2013.
  29. "Daily Data Report for November 1903". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  30. "Daily Data Report for July 1931". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  31. "Dauphin". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  32. "Dauphin CS". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  33. "CRTC Decision 89-114". April 6, 1989.
  1. Climate data was recorded at Dauphin from January 1890 to December 1941 and at Dauphin Airport from January 1942 to present.
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