Datteln

Datteln is a town in the district of Recklinghausen, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is situated on a crossroads of four canals (Datteln-Hamm Canal, Wesel-Datteln Canal, Dortmund-Ems Canal and Rhein-Herne Canal), which makes it the biggest canal junction in the World, approx. 10 km north-east of Recklinghausen and 20 km north-west of Dortmund.

Datteln

Coat of arms
Location of Datteln within Recklinghausen district
Datteln
Datteln
Coordinates: 51°39′14″N 7°20′30″E
CountryGermany
StateNorth Rhine-Westphalia
Admin. regionMünster
DistrictRecklinghausen
Subdivisions2
Government
  MayorAndré Dora (SPD)
Area
  Total66.08 km2 (25.51 sq mi)
Elevation
49 m (161 ft)
Population
 (2018-12-31)[1]
  Total34,614
  Density520/km2 (1,400/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
45711
Dialling codes0 23 63
Vehicle registrationRE
Websitewww.datteln.de

Katja Seizinger, former alpine skier and triple Olympic gold medallist, was born in Datteln.[2]

Born in Datteln

  • Horst Niggemeier (1929–2000), politician, mayor of Datteln
  • Reinhard Lettmann (1933–2013), Bishop of Münster (1980–2008)
  • Egon Ramms (born 1948), General, 2007-2010 commander at NATO
  • Klaus Eberhard (born 1957) Director of Sport of German Tennis Federation and former German professional tennis player
  • Ingo Anderbrügge (born 1964), football player and coach
  • Katja Seizinger (born 1972), ski racer; three times Sportswoman of the Year
  • Dunja Hayali (born 1974), journalist and television presenter
  • Charlotte Becker (born 1983), cyclist
  • Lukas Nottbeck (born 1988), football player
  • Sarah Petrausch (born 1990), German volleyball national team player
  • Ruben (born 1985), German scientist, visionaire, revolutionized card gaming.

International relations

Datteln is twinned with:

References

  1. "Bevölkerung der Gemeinden Nordrhein-Westfalens am 31. Dezember 2018" (in German). Landesbetrieb Information und Technik NRW. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  2. Mallon, Bill; Heijmans, Jeroen (2011). Historical Dictionary of the Olympic Movement (4 ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 322. ISBN 9780810875227. Retrieved 28 December 2013.
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