Constantin Coandă

Constantin Coandă (4 March 1857 30 September 1932)[1][2] was a Romanian soldier and politician. He reached the rank of general in the Romanian Army, and later became a mathematics professor at the National School of Bridges and Roads in Bucharest. Among his seven children was Henri Coandă, the discoverer of the Coandă effect.

Constantin Coandă
Prime Minister of Romania
In office
24 October 1918  29 November 1918
MonarchFerdinand I of Romania
Preceded byAlexandru Marghiloman
Succeeded byIon I. C. Brătianu
President of the Senate of Romania
In office
22 June 1920  22 January 1922
MonarchFerdinand I of Romania
Preceded byPaul Bujor
Succeeded byMihail Pherekyde
In office
18 July 1926  5 June 1927
Preceded byConstantin I. Nicolaescu
Succeeded byConstantin I. Nicolaescu
Personal details
Born(1857-03-04)4 March 1857
Craiova, Wallachia
Died30 September 1932(1932-09-30) (aged 75)
Bucharest, Kingdom of Romania
Spouse(s)Aïda Danet
Children7 children (among them Henri Coandă)
Military service
Branch/serviceRomanian Land Forces
RankGeneral de corp de armată

During World War I, for a short time (24 October 29 November 1918), he was the Prime Minister of Romania[3] and the Foreign Affairs Minister. He participated in the signing of the Treaty of Neuilly between the Allies of World War I and Bulgaria.

Coandă was born in Craiova. On 8 December 1920, during his term as President of the Senate of Romania (representing Alexandru Averescu's People's Party), he was badly wounded by a bomb set up by the terrorist and anarchist Max Goldstein.

He died on 30 September 1932, aged 75, in Bucharest.

References

  1. Schimbam, Uniti (29 November 2018). "Evenimentele Zilei de 29 noiembrie în Istorie". Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  2. Nicolae Titulescu (1994). Romania's foreign policy: 1937. Encyclopaedic Publishing House. p. 305. ISBN 978-973-45-0092-5.
  3. Kurt W. Treptow; Centrul de Studii Românești̦ (1999). Romania During the World War I Era. Center for Romanian Studies.
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