City of Liverpool (New South Wales)

The Liverpool City Council is a local government area to the south-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The area encompasses 305.5 square kilometres (118.0 sq mi) and its administrative centre is located in the suburb of Liverpool.

Liverpool City Council
New South Wales
Coordinates33°56′S 150°55′E
Population
 • Density668.82/km2 (1,732.25/sq mi)
Established27 June 1872 (1872-06-27)
(as a municipal district)
Area305.5 km2 (118.0 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+11)
MayorWendy Waller
Council seatLiverpool
RegionGreater Western Sydney
State electorate(s)
Federal Division(s)
WebsiteLiverpool City Council
LGAs around Liverpool City Council:
Penrith Fairfield Canterbury-Bankstown
Wollondilly Liverpool City Council Canterbury-Bankstown
Camden Campbelltown Sutherland

The Mayor of the City is Cr. Wendy Waller, a member of the Labor Party.

Suburbs and localities in the local government area

The following suburbs and localities are located within the Liverpool City Council:

Demographics

At the 2016 census there were 204,326 people in the Liverpool local government area, of these 49.6 per cent were male and 50.4 per cent were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 1.5 per cent of the population; significantly below the NSW and Australian averages of 2.9 and 2.8 per cent respectively. The median age of people in the Liverpool City Council was 33 years; significantly lower than the national median of 38 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 22.7 per cent of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 10.4 per cent of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 51.8 per cent were married and 11.0 per cent were either divorced or separated.[1]

Population growth in the Liverpool City Council between the 2001 census and the 2006 census was 7.14 per cent and in the subsequent five years to the 2011 census, population growth was 9.44 per cent. At the 2016 census, the population in the City increased by 13.24 per cent. When compared with total population growth of Australia for the same period, being 8.8 per cent, population growth in the Liverpool local government area was significantly higher than the national average.[1][3][4][5] The median weekly income for residents within the City of Liverpool was lower than the national average.

At the 2016 census, the area was linguistically diverse, with a significantly higher than average proportion (57.2 per cent) where two or more languages are spoken (national average was 22.2 per cent); and a significantly lower proportion (41.4 per cent) where English only was spoken at home (national average was 72.7 per cent). The proportion of residents who stated a religious affiliation with Islam was in excess of four times the national average; and the proportion of residents with no religion slightly less than one–third the national average.[1]

Selected historical census data for Liverpool local government area
Census year2001[3]2006[4]2011[5]2016[1]
PopulationEstimated residents on census night153,633164,603180,143204,326
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales16th 12th 9th
% of New South Wales population2.60% 2.73%
% of Australian population0.82% 0.83% 0.83% 0.87%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Australian15.5% 13.4%
English12.6% 11.3%
Italian6.1% 5.4%
Indian4.9% 5.2%
Lebanese4.3% 4.8%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Arabic6.4% 7.6% 9.5% 11.4%
Hindi3.2% 3.8% 4.5% 4.0%
Vietnamese3.6% 4.1% 4.4% 4.9%
Spanish3.2% 3.1% 2.8% 2.5%
Serbiann/cn/cn/c 2.4%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic35.9% 34.0% 32.4% 28.6%
Islam7.5% 8.3% 10.7% 12.7%
No religion, so described6.3% 6.8% 7.5% 11.3%
Not stated, so describedn/cn/cn/c 9.2%
Anglican15.2% 12.3% 10.7% 7.4%
Median weekly incomes
Personal incomeMedian weekly personal incomeA$440A$510A$584[6]
% of Australian median income94.4% 88.4% 88.2%
Family incomeMedian weekly family incomeA$1,082A$1,401 A$1,663
% of Australian median income105.4% 94.6% 95.9%
Household incomeMedian weekly household incomeA$1,155A$1,299 A$1,550
% of Australian median income98.6% 105.7% 107.8%

Council

Current composition and election method

Liverpool City Council is composed of eleven Councillors, including the Mayor, for a fixed four-year term of office. The Mayor is directly elected while the ten other Councillors are elected proportionally as two separate wards, each electing five Councillors. The most recent election was held on 10 September 2016, and the makeup of the Council, including the Mayor, is as follows:[7][8][9]

PartyCouncillors
Australian Labor Party 5
Liberal Party 4
Liverpool Community Independents Team 2
Total 11

The current Council, elected in 2016, in order of election by ward, is:

WardCouncillorPartyNotes
Mayor Wendy Waller Labor Elected 2016–date, 2008–2012.[10] North Ward Councillor 1995–2004, 2012–2016.
Deputy Mayor 1997–1998, 1999–2000, 2001–2002, 2002–2003.[11]
North Ward[12] Ali Karnib Labor Elected 2008, 1999–2004.[11] Deputy Mayor 2016–2017, 2018–date.[13][14]
Mazhar Hadid Liberal Elected 2008. Deputy Mayor 2012–2014.
Peter Harle Community Independents Elected 2008.
Nathan Hagarty Labor Elected 2016.
Gus Balloot Liberal Elected 2012.
South Ward[15] Tony Hadchiti Liberal Elected 2008. Deputy Mayor 2015–2016.
Geoff Shelton Labor Elected 2012.
Tina Ayyad Liberal Elected 2016. Deputy Mayor 2017–2018.[16]
Charishma Kaliyanda Labor Elected 2016.
Karress Rhodes Community Independents Elected 2016.

Mayors

Mayor Party Term Notes
Ron Dunbier Labor December 1948 – 9 December 1952 [17][18][19][20]
Alex Grimson Labor 9 December 1952 – 14 January 1953 [21][22][23]
Independent 14 January 1953 – December 1954
John Macdonald December 1954 – December 1955
Bill Ryan December 1955 – December 1956
Ron Dunbier Independent December 1956 – December 1959 [17]
Joseph Bradshaw Independent December 1959 – December 1960 [17]
Ernie Smith December 1960 – December 1961 [17]
Ron Dunbier Independent December 1961 – December 1962 [17]
Joseph Bradshaw Independent December 1962 – December 1963 [17]
Ernie Smith December 1963 – December 1967 [17]
George Paciullo Labor December 1967 – December 1969 [17]
Joseph Bradshaw Independent December 1969 – September 1971 [17]
Kevin Napier Labor September 1971 – September 1972 [17]
Noel Short September 1972 – September 1973 [17]
Joe Durrant September 1973 – September 1974 [17][24]
Frank Oliveri Independent September 1974 – September 1975 [17]
Joseph Bradshaw Independent September 1975 – 31 March 1976 [17]
Allen Henderson (Administrator) 31 March 1976 – 17 September 1977 [25][26]
Frank Oliveri Independent September 1977 – September 1978 [17]
Noel Short Labor September 1978 – September 1979 [17]
Ronald John Hollands September 1979 – September 1980 [17]
Noel Short September 1980 – September 1983 [17]
Frank Oliveri OAM Independent September 1983 – September 1984 [17][27]
Casey Conway Labor September 1984 – September 1986 [17]
Craig Knowles September 1986 – September 1987 [17]
Casey Conway September 1987 – September 1988 [28]
Gary Lucas Independent September 1988 – September 1989 [17]
Ronald John Hollands Labor September 1989 – September 1990 [17]
Colin Harrington Independent September 1990 – September 1991 [17]
Mark Latham Labor September 1991 – September 1994 [29]
George Paciullo September 1994 – 16 March 2004 [17]
Gabrielle Kibble AO (Administrator) 16 March 2004 – 13 September 2008 [30][31]
Wendy Waller Labor 13 September 2008 – 8 September 2012 [32][33]
Ned Mannoun Liberal 8 September 2012 – 10 September 2016 [34][35][36]
Wendy Waller Labor 10 September 2016 – date [10]

History

It is one of the oldest urban settlements in Australia, founded in 1810 as an agricultural centre by Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He named it after Robert Banks Jenkinson, Earl of Liverpool, who was then the Secretary of State for the Colonies and the British city of Liverpool upon which some of the city's architecture is based.

Liverpool is at the head of navigation of the Georges River and combined with the Great Southern Railway from Sydney to Melbourne reaching Liverpool in the late 1850s, Liverpool became a major agricultural and transportation centre as the land in the district was very productive. A large army base was established in Liverpool during World War I, and exists to this day as the Holsworthy Barracks. There are a number of other military establishments in neighbouring Moorebank.

Until the 1950s, Liverpool was still a satellite town with an agricultural economy based on poultry farming and market gardening. However the tidal surge of urban sprawl which engulfed the rich flatlands west of Sydney known as the Cumberland Plain soon reached Liverpool, and it became an outer suburb of metropolitan Sydney with a strong working-class presence and manufacturing facilities. Liverpool also became renowned for its vast Housing Commission estates housing thousands of low-income families after the slum clearance and urban renewal programs in inner-city Sydney in the 1960s.

The City of Liverpool is home to the largest municipal library in Australia,[37]

See also

References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Liverpool (C)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 5 July 2017.
  2. "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019. Estimated resident population (ERP) at 30 June 2018.
  3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (9 March 2006). "Liverpool (C)". 2001 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  4. Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Liverpool (C)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  5. Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Liverpool (C)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  6. "2016 Census QuickStats: Liverpool (C)". quickstats.censusdata.abs.gov.au. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  7. "Liverpool City Council - Mayoral Election". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 13 September 2012. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 21 September 2012.
  8. "Liverpool City Council - North Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 15 September 2012. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 21 September 2012.
  9. "Liverpool City Council - South Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 15 September 2012. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 21 September 2012.
  10. "Liverpool Mayoral Results". Electoral Commission of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  11. "2002/2003 Annual Report" (PDF). Liverpool City Council. pp. 9–10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 September 2006. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  12. "Liverpool North Ward Results". Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2016. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  13. Milton, Ashleigh (18 October 2016). "Liverpool's new deputy mayor is councillor Ali Karnib". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  14. Wong, Madelaine (28 September 2018). "Ali Karnib dubbed deputy mayor again". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  15. "Liverpool South Ward Results". Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 17 September 2016. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  16. Ngo, Cindy (3 October 2017). "Liberal councillor Tina Ayyad appointed deputy mayor". Liverpool Leader. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  17. "History of Liverpool City Council". Liverpool City Council. Archived from the original on 30 August 2007. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  18. "ALD. R. DUNBIER MAYOR OF LIVERPOOL". The Biz. New South Wales, Australia. 7 December 1949. p. 3. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  19. "Ex-mayor Of Liverpool Given Bond". The Sydney Morning Herald (36, 307). New South Wales, Australia. 4 May 1954. p. 7. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  20. Latham, Mark (May–June 1989). "Ron Dunbier – The Prince of Livepool". The Hummer. The Australian Society for the Study of Labour History. 24. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  21. "MAYOR OF LIVERPOOL". The Biz. New South Wales, Australia. 11 December 1952. p. 12. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  22. "EXPELLED BY A.L.P." The Biz. New South Wales, Australia. 15 January 1953. p. 1. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  23. "British trying to halt strike". The Sun (13, 682). New South Wales, Australia. 16 December 1953. p. 25. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  24. Lee, Sally (21 October 2014). "Gough Whitlam helped build the city of Liverpool". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  25. "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (43). New South Wales, Australia. 31 March 1976. p. 1451. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  26. "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (27). New South Wales, Australia. 18 March 1977. p. 1032. Retrieved 10 May 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  27. "Salute to days of thunder". Liverpool City Champion. 19 March 2013. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  28. Wong, Madelaine (29 June 2018). "TRIBUTE: 'Casey Conway was true to his word'". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  29. "Council finance record hounds Latham". The Age. 6 July 2004. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  30. "Council staff and structure". Liverpool City Council. Archived from the original on 30 August 2007. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  31. "Liverpool Council sacked over Oasis blunder". The Sydney Morning Herald. 16 March 2004. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  32. Green, Antony. "Liverpool City Council - 2008 Local Council Elections". ABC News. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  33. Demian, Shery (4 September 2012). "Work Together: Former mayors call for harmony". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  34. Green, Antony. "Liverpool City Council". 2012 NSW Local Council Elections. ABC News. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  35. Abdurahman, Farah (11 September 2012). "Liverpool makes history: Ned Mannoun, city's youngest and first ever Liberal mayor-elect". Liverpool City Champion. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  36. Dalzell, Stephanie (9 August 2016). "Embattled Liverpool Mayor Ned Mannoun will not seek re-election next month". ABC News. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  37. "Sydney's Great Libraries". AroundYou. 18 September 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2016.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.