CJ-10 (missile)

The CJ-10 (simplified Chinese: 长剑-10; traditional Chinese: 長劍-10; pinyin: Cháng Jiàn 10; literally: 'long sword 10') is a second-generation[1] Chinese ground-based land-attack missile.[5] It is derived from the Kh-55 missile.[6] It is reportedly manufactured by the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation Third Academy and the China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy.[1]

CJ-10
CJ-10 Cruise missile on WS2400 TEL
TypeLand attack cruise missile
Air-launched cruise missile
Place of originChina
Service history
Used byChina
Production history
ManufacturerChina Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation/China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy
Specifications
Warhead500 kg (1,100 lb)[1], conventional or nuclear[2]

Operational
range
>1,500 km (930 mi; 810 nmi)
Guidance
system
Launch
platform

Initially, the CJ-10 was identified as the DH-10 (Chinese: 东海-10; pinyin: Dong Hai 10; literally: 'east sea 10') by Western media and analysts.[7][8] United States Department of Defense reports used "DH-10" until 2011,[9][10] and then "CJ-10" from 2012.[11][12] Publications may use both terms interchangeably.[1][13] The Center for Strategic and International Studies believes that the CJ-10 is a member of the Hongniao (HN) series of missiles[14]; Ian Easton believes that the CJ-10 is the same missile as the HN-2, and that the HN-3 is the "DH-10A".[15]

Description

In the September 2014 edition of Joint Forces Quarterly, an article reportedly described CJ-10 as a subsonic missile with a range of more than 1,500 km and a 500 kg payload. The article attributes the missile having a guidance package using inertial navigation system, satellite navigation, Terrain Contour Matching, and a likely Digital Scene-Mapping Area Correlator for terminal guidance. Ships and ground transporter erector launchers were listed as launch platforms.[1]

In 2013, the United States believes that the missile has a range of more than 1,500 km, and can potentially carry either conventional or nuclear payloads;[2] other sources claim the missile has ranges of 2,000 km (1,200 mi; 1,100 nmi),[16] or as much as 4,000 km (2,500 mi; 2,200 nmi).[17] In 2004, the CJ-10 was credited with a CEP of 10 m.[18]

The YJ-100 is a subsonic anti-ship missile version of the CJ-10 with a range of 800 km (500 mi; 430 nmi). The missile can be air-launched by the H-6 bomber and fired from a vertical launch system of the Type 055 destroyer.[19] The YJ-100 will have an onboard radar and is potentially a counter to the American Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM).[20]

Development

The development of the CJ-10 could have potentially benefited significantly from Chinese acquisition of Western and Soviet missile technology in the 1990s, notably the Kh-55 (purchased from Ukraine), and the Tomahawk missiles (that were unexploded and purchased from Iraq, Pakistan, and Serbia).[15] The detailed production engineering data packages of the Kh-55 LACM were bought from Ukraine in 2001.[21] A 1995 Russian document suggested a complete production facility had been transferred to Shanghai, for the development of a nuclear-armed cruise missile. Originally it was thought that this was based on the 300 km-range Raduga Kh-15 (AS-16 'Kickback'), but it now appears that it was the Kh-55 that was transferred to China.[6]

Jane's Information Group reported the CJ-10 was tested 2004.[18] An August 2012 report by Jane's indicated that a shipborne variance of the missile may have been tested on Bi Sheng, a Chinese weapons trial ship.[22]

The United States in 2008 estimated that 50–250 missiles were in service,[23] increasing to 150–350 in 2009.[24]

Variants

CJ-10
CJ-10K
Air-launched version with a 1500 km range; may be carried by the Xian H-6K.[25]
DF-10A
Ground attack cruise missile.[25] Reportedly a stealthier, more accurate, version of the CJ-10.[15]
"DH-2000"
Supposedly a supersonic version of the DH-10A.[26]
CJ-20
Air-launched version of the CJ-10.[27] Reportedly been tested on the Xian H-6; each bomber may carry four missiles externally.[28]
YJ-100
Anti-ship missile version with an 800 km range, launched by H-6 bomber and Type 055 warship.[20][19]

Operators

 China

See also

  • YJ-62 – similar anti-ship missile

References

  1. Gormley et. al: p.102
  2. United States National Air and Space Intelligence Center Public Affairs Office: p.29
  3. "PLA's Type 093G submarines 'could destroy Izumo'". Want China Times. 7 April 2015. Archived from the original on 19 July 2015. Retrieved 5 August 2015.
  4. "China Destroyer Consolidates Innovations, Other Ship Advances". AFCEA. 1 December 2013.
  5. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2015, p.39
  6. "China's new cruise missile programme 'racing ahead'". Jane's Defence Weekly. 12 January 2000. Archived from the original on 4 June 2009.
  7. Kopp, Carlo; Andrew, Martin (27 January 2014). "PLA Cruise Missiles; PLA Air–Surface Missiles". Air Power Australia.net. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  8. Easton: p.1
  9. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2011, p.2
  10. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2011, p.31
  11. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2012, p.21
  12. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2012, p.42
  13. United States National Air and Space Intelligence Center Public Affairs Office: p.27
  14. https://missilethreat.csis.org/missile/hong-niao/
  15. Easton: p.3
  16. "DF-10 / CJ-10 / DH-10 surface-to-surface cruise missile". Army Recognition.com. 23 January 2016.
  17. "Glimpse of China's New Fighter Fuels Rumors". Defense News.com. 5 August 2012.
  18. Minnick, Wendell (21 September 2004). "China tests new land-attack cruise missile". Jane's. Archived from the original on 29 September 2004. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  19. "China's anti-ship missiles YJ-12 and YJ-100 revealed". China Military Online. 4 February 2015.
  20. Lin, Jeffrey; Singer, P. W. (10 March 2015). "China Shows Off Its Deadly New Cruise Missiles". Popular Science.
  21. "Hatf-7 Babur GLCM". Global Security. Retrieved 16 September 2016.
  22. Rahmat, Ridzwan (14 October 2014). "PLAN commissions fourth Dahua-class vessel". Jane's. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  23. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense (2008). Annual Report To Congress: Military Power of the People's Republic of China 2008 (PDF) (Report). p. 56. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  24. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense (2009). Annual Report To Congress: Military Power of the People's Republic of China 2009 (PDF) (Report). p. 66. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  25. Fisher, Richard D., Jr. (4 September 2015). "China showcases new weapon systems at 3 September parade". IHS Jane's 360. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  26. Easton: p.5
  27. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2015, p.46
  28. Gormley et. al: p.103
  29. United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2010, p.31
Bibliography
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