Bhamo

Manmaw (Burmese: ဗန်းမော်မြို့ ban: mau mrui., also spelt Banmaw) is a city of Kachin State in the northernmost part of Myanmar, located 186 km (116 mi) south from the capital city of the state of Kachin (Myitkyina). It is on the Ayeyarwady River. It lies within 65 km (40 mi) of the border with Yunnan Province, China.[3] The population consists of Chinese and Shan, with Kachin peoples in the hills around the town. It is the administrative center of Manmaw District and Manmaw Township.

Manmaw

ဗန်းမော်မြို့

Hsinkai[1]

Flag
Manmaw
Location in Burma
Coordinates: 24°16′0″N 97°14′0″E
Country Myanmar
Division Kachin State
DistrictManmaw District
TownshipManmaw Township
Population
 (2005)
  Total47,920[2]
  Ethnicities
Shan, Kachin, Chinese
  Religions
Theravada Buddhism
Time zoneUTC+6.30 (MST)
ClimateCwa

Not to be confused with Banmauk

Etymology

" Manmaw" derives from the Shan language term "Manmaw" (Shan: မၢၼ်ႈမေႃႇး; /maan˧ mɔ˧/), which means "potter's village."[4]

History

From 1869 to 1879, it was the seat of British colonial Assistant political agent, subordinate to the Resident with the king of and in Ava. As of 1935, the town was situated at the highest navigable point of the river, and was the terminus of caravan routes from India and Burma, by which jade, in particular, was brought into China.

Manmaw was once called Sampanago, the capital of the now-extinct Shan predecessor kingdom of Wanmaw. The ruins of the old city walls, dating from the fifth century, are found some 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) from the modern town.

Contemporary

A once weekly Myanma Airways flight is available, as are three times a week river ferries. It is the terminus of river ferries from Mandalay. There is no river ferry between Bhamo and state capital Myitkyina. The land route between Bhamo and Mu Se District (Muse, part of Northern Shan State), is in poor condition.

Manmaw is one of the official border trading towns between China and Myanmar.

Education

The town is home to Manmaw University. One can also study Engineering at Technological University(Bamaw), and computer and networking at Computer University(Bamaw).

Climate

Manmaw has a climate that lies in the transition between humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cwa) and tropical savanna climate (Köppen climate classification Aw). Temperatures are very warm throughout the year, although the winter months (December–February) are milder. There is a winter dry season (November–April) and a summer wet season (May–October).

Climate data for Bhamo (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 30.6
(87.1)
35.8
(96.4)
39.0
(102.2)
39.5
(103.1)
41.3
(106.3)
41.5
(106.7)
36.5
(97.7)
37.0
(98.6)
38.5
(101.3)
36.9
(98.4)
33.6
(92.5)
31.5
(88.7)
41.5
(106.7)
Average high °C (°F) 25.6
(78.1)
28.1
(82.6)
31.7
(89.1)
34.0
(93.2)
33.9
(93.0)
32.3
(90.1)
31.4
(88.5)
31.7
(89.1)
31.9
(89.4)
30.9
(87.6)
28.1
(82.6)
25.5
(77.9)
30.4
(86.7)
Average low °C (°F) 10.1
(50.2)
12.5
(54.5)
16.0
(60.8)
20.2
(68.4)
23.1
(73.6)
24.7
(76.5)
24.8
(76.6)
24.5
(76.1)
23.8
(74.8)
21.7
(71.1)
16.5
(61.7)
11.9
(53.4)
19.2
(66.6)
Record low °C (°F) 7.0
(44.6)
7.7
(45.9)
9.5
(49.1)
16.5
(61.7)
19.0
(66.2)
21.5
(70.7)
22.0
(71.6)
21.0
(69.8)
21.2
(70.2)
16.2
(61.2)
10.0
(50.0)
6.8
(44.2)
6.8
(44.2)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 5.4
(0.21)
14.6
(0.57)
15.0
(0.59)
52.6
(2.07)
177.1
(6.97)
344.6
(13.57)
406.0
(15.98)
411.8
(16.21)
217.1
(8.55)
129.0
(5.08)
38.7
(1.52)
7.3
(0.29)
1,819.2
(71.62)
Source: Norwegian Meteorological Institute[5]

See also

References & Sources

  1. "An Introduction to the Toponymy of Burma" The Permanent Committee of Geographic Names (PCGN), United Kingdom, October 2007, page 12, accessed 18 April 2010
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 20 June 2015. Retrieved 20 June 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. "Manmaw", Encyclopædia Britannica
  4. Tun, Than (1988). "Observations on the Translation and Annotation of the Royal Orders Of Burma". Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. 4 (1): 91–99. JSTOR 40860260.
  5. "Myanmar Climate Report" (PDF). Norwegian Meteorological Institute. pp. 23–36. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 October 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  • This article incorporates text from The Modern World Encyclopædia: Illustrated (1935); out of UK copyright as of 2005.
    • This may be out of date or biased to the timeframe of that reference.
  • WorldStatesmen - Burma/Myanmar

Further reading

  • 17th Century Burma and the Dutch East Indies Company 1634-1680, by Wil O. Dijk, NIAS Press

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