Azetidine

Azetidine is a saturated heterocyclic organic compound containing three carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. It is a liquid at room temperature with a strong odor of ammonia and is strongly basic compared to most secondary amines.

Azetidine
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Azetidine[1]
Systematic IUPAC name
Azacyclobutane
Other names
Azetane
Trimethylene imine
1,3-Propylenimine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
102384
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.240
EC Number
  • 207-963-8
986
UNII
Properties
C3H7N
Molar mass 57.09 g/mol
Appearance Clear slight brown liquid
Density 0.847 g/cm3 at 25 °C
Boiling point 61 to 62 °C (142 to 144 °F; 334 to 335 K)
miscible
Acidity (pKa) 11.29 (conjugate acid; H2O)[2]
Hazards
Main hazards Somewhat strong base, combustible
GHS pictograms
GHS Signal word Danger
H225, H314
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P264, P280, P301+330+331, P303+361+353, P304+340, P305+351+338, P310, P321, P363, P370+378, P403+235, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YN ?)
Infobox references

Natural occurrence

Azetidine and its derivatives are relatively rare structural motifs in natural products. Notably, they are a key component of mugineic acids and penaresidins. Perhaps the most abundant azetidine containing natural product is azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, a toxic homolog of proline.

See also

  • Azete, the unsaturated analog

References

  1. "Front Matter". Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 147. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4.
  2. Haynes, William M., ed. (2016). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (97th ed.). CRC Press. p. 5–89. ISBN 978-1498754286.


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