Australaves

Australaves[1] is a recently defined[2] clade of birds, consisting of the Eufalconimorphae (passerines, parrots and falcons) as well as the Cariamiformes (including seriemas and the extinct "terror birds").[3] They appear to be the sister group of Afroaves.[3] As in the case of Afroaves, the most basal clades have predatory extant members, suggesting this was the ancestral lifestyle;[4] however, some researchers like Darren Naish are skeptical of this assessment, since some extinct representatives such as the herbivorous Strigogyps lead other lifestyles.[5] Basal parrots and falcons are at any rate vaguely crow-like and probably omnivorous.[6]

Australaves

Cariamiformes (seriemas)

Eufalconimorphae

Falconiformes (falcons)

Psittacopasserae

Psittaciformes (parrots)

Passeriformes (passerines)

Australaves
Temporal range:
Late Cretaceous - Holocene, 66–0 Ma
Kestrel, Falco tinnunculus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Clade: Telluraves
Clade: Australaves
Ericson, 2012
Clades

Cladogram of Telluraves relationships based on Prum, R.O. et al. (2015).[3]

References

  1. Kimball RT, Wang N, Heimer-McGinn V, Ferguson C, Braun EL (2013). "Identifying localized biases in large datasets: A case study using the Avian Tree of Life". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 69 (3): 1021–1032. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2013.05.029. PMID 23791948.
  2. Ericson, P. G. (2012). "Evolution of terrestrial birds in three continents: biogeography and parallel radiations". Journal of Biogeography. 39 (5): 813–824. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02650.x.
  3. Prum, R.O. et al. (2015) A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing. Nature 526, 569–573.
  4. Jarvis, E. D.; Mirarab, S.; Aberer, A. J.; Li, B.; Houde, P.; Li, C.; Ho, S. Y. W.; Faircloth, B. C.; Nabholz, B.; Howard, J. T.; Suh, A.; Weber, C. C.; Da Fonseca, R. R.; Li, J.; Zhang, F.; Li, H.; Zhou, L.; Narula, N.; Liu, L.; Ganapathy, G.; Boussau, B.; Bayzid, M. S.; Zavidovych, V.; Subramanian, S.; Gabaldon, T.; Capella-Gutierrez, S.; Huerta-Cepas, J.; Rekepalli, B.; Munch, K.; et al. (2014). "Whole-genome analyses resolve early branches in the tree of life of modern birds" (PDF). Science. 346 (6215): 1320–1331. doi:10.1126/science.1253451. PMC 4405904. PMID 25504713. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-24. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  5. Mayr, G. & Ritchter, G. (2011) Exceptionally preserved plant parenchyma in the digestive tract indicates a herbivorous diet in the Middle Eocene bird Strigogyps sapea (Ameghinornithidae). Paläontologische Zeitschrift, Volume 85, Issue 3, pp 303–307.
  6. L. D. Martin. 2010. Paleogene avifauna of the holarctic. Vertebrata PalAsiatica 48:367-374


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