Aguila (film)

Águila (transl.Eagle) is 1980 film written, produced and directed by Eddie Romero, touted as "the biggest event in local movie history" and "the biggest Filipino film ever made". It is top-billed by Fernando Poe Jr. together with an ensemble cast.[1][2][3]

Águila
Theatrical poster
Directed byEddie Romero
Produced by
  • Eddie Romero
  • Rolando S. Atienza
  • Rafael M. Fabie
Screenplay byEddie Romero
Story byEddie Romero
StarringFernando Poe Jr.
Music byRyan Cayabyab
Cinematography
Edited byBen Samson
Production
company
Bancom Audiovision
Distributed byBancom Audiovision
Release date
February 14, 1980
Running time
210 minutes
CountryPhilippines
LanguageFilipino
Budget₱5,000,000.00

Plot

Flashbacks encompass the history of the Philippines as well as the life story of the elderly Daniel Águila. The Águila family gathers to celebrate Daniel's 88th birthday, but the old man is nowhere to be seen - he has been missing for a decade. Suspecting that his father is in Mindanao, one of his sons takes off for that region in a determined search. Along the way, his memories of the nation and his father's life tell the story of eighty tumultuous years of personal and historical development.[4]

Synopsis

Águila chronicles the passionate saga of the life and times of a Filipino family.

It is 1980. The influential and affluent Águila family celebrate the 88th birthday of their missing and long-presumed dead patriarch, Daniel Águila (Fernando Poe Jr.). It truly becomes a celebration of Daniel's life when his son, Mari (Christopher de Leon), receives news that Daniel is alive, living somewhere in the provinces. Mari, a business tycoon and former Senator, combs the countryside in search of his father. In the course of his search, the Águila family history is unravelled. Spanning a period of 80 years, it covers the 1896 Philippine Revolution, the American occupation, the Japanese era, Post-War reconstruction and the student militant activities of the late 1960s to early 1970s.

It all begins when Daniel's father, Artemio (Dave Brodett), an officer in the Revolutionary Army, dies by treachery. His mother, Isabel Teodoro (Amalia Fuentes), is raped by that same traitor, Simeon Garrido (Eddie Garcia), and later marries him for convenience. As a young soldier accompanying Simeon to Mindanao, Daniel again becomes witness to injustice: Simeon and some Americans ruthlessly take away Muslim tribal lands.

Daniel's life is one of complexity - of human emotions and relationships. His affair with a Muslim woman, Farida (Andrea Andolong), results in a love-child, Osman (Jay Ilagan). He marries Sally (Charo Santos), Mari's mother, who later falls ill and dies. He also discovers the incestuous liaison between Simeon and Lilian (Elizabeth Oropesa), his half-sister, who in turns unsuccessfully attempts to seduce him.

Daniel's expiriences during World War II and with the American-controlled post-war government only increase his mounting disenchantment with life and society. Mari's amoral political ambitions and his grandson's, Raul (Ricky Sandico), activist stance drives him further into disillusionment. Finally, Daniel heeds his longing for peace and leaves.

Mari's journey ends when he finds Daniel in an Aeta village, where Daniel has found serenity, far from the maddening machinations and injustices committed by a civilized society.[5]

Cast of Characters

Production

The film had a budget of ₱5,000,000.00 and boasted 12 stars, 60 production staff and crewmen and 7,000 extras.[6]

The film was shot in 120 different locations.[6] The film's Art Director, Mel Chionglo, built a Magdiwang camp and an Ilongot village in the hills of Tanay and an Aeta village in Los Baños Chionglo had three assistants, two set men and ten carpenters to help in this work. Chionglo also designed sets for an 1897 evening in Binondo, a Muslim waterfront in 1918 Nasugbu, Batangas, a courthouse in 1924 Magdalena, Laguna, a Roaring Twenties cabaret in Makati, a Japanese garrison in Lumban, Laguna, and other settings.[6]

The film took 100 days to shoot the 204 pages of script written for it, the latter having been written over a two-year period.[6]

Actress Rio Locsin was originally cast to play Huk commander Diwata but was replaced by Chanda Romero, director Eddie Romero's niece,[7] when she failed to show up on her first shooting day.[6]

The production was infamously marred by tensions between the crew, as Eddie Romero frequently butted heads with Mel Chionglo.[8] Romero likewise clashed with set decorator, and now screenwriter, Racquel Villavicencio over unreasonable production demands.[8] In addition, cinematographer Mike de Leon walked out on the project altogether.[6] However, while tensions were building between members of the crew, no such tensions were reported among the actors and Romero himself. Romero was described as being a "cool director", not having been angered by the actors on the set.[8]

Romero was notoriously late on the set, but the actors would arrive even later than Romero himself.[6] Despite this however, Romero tolerated the different personalities between the actors and allowed them to bond, ususally over meals in between shoots.[8]

Upon the release of the film, a small criticism launched at it was that the actors who are supposed to age do not look like they aged a day.[6] Most notably, Amalia Fuentes refused to show age in the film despite portraying the mother of FPJ's character, Daniel.[8][9]

FPJ choreographed the fight and war scenes.[6]

FPJ's daughter, future Senator, Grace Poe cameoed in the film as Daria Ramirez's sister.[10]

In addition, Bancom Audiovision also spent ₱100,000.00 for an hour-long made for television documentary film on the making of Águila and hired producer Jesse M. Ejército as advertising and marketing consultant.[6]

This is the second of Eddie Romero's epic historical film trilogy, wedged in between "Ganito Kami Noon, Paano Kayo Ngayon?" and "Kamakalawa".[11]

Music

The film's theme song "Iduyan Mo" was composed by Ryan Cayabyab specifically for the film[6] and sung by Basil Valdez.[12]

Awards and Nominations

YearAward-Giving BodyCategoryRecipientResult
1981
FAMAS Award[13]
Best PictureAguilaWon
Best DirectorEddie RomeroWon
Best ScreenplayEddie RomeroWon
Best CinematographyMike AccionWon
Best ActorChristopher de LeonNominated
Best Supporting ActorJay IlaganNominated
Gawad Urian Award[14]
Best Supporting Actress (Pinakamahusay na Pangalawang Aktres)Daria RamirezWon
Best Picture (Pinakamahusay na Pelikula)AguilaNominated
Best Direction (Pinakamahusay na Direksyon)Eddie RomeroNominated
Best Supporting Actor (Pinakamahusay na Pangalawang Aktor)Jay IlaganNominated
Best Supporting Actor (Pinakamahusay na Pangalawang Aktor)Joonee GamboaNominated
Best Cinematography (Pinakamahusay na Sinematograpiya)Eddie Romero and Rody LacapNominated
Best Screenplay (Pinakamahusay na Dulang Pampelikula)Eddie RomeroNominated
Best Editing (Pinakamahusay na Editing)Ben BarcelonNominated
Best Music (Pinakamahusay na Musika)Iduyan Mo by Ryan CayabyabNominated

References

  1. Santos, Simon (July 21, 2019). "THE EIGHTIES # 12: FERNANDO POE, JR., AMALIA FUENTES, CHRISTOPHER DE LEON, EDDIE GARCIA, CHARO SANTOS, ELIZABETH OROPESA, JAY ILAGAN, CHANDA ROMERO, IN EDDIE ROMERO'S "AGUILA" (1980)". Video48 Blog. Retrieved October 26, 2019.
  2. Bardinas, Mary Ann (November 13, 2018). "Mga pelikula ni FPJ na yumanig sa takilya". ABS-CBN Entertainment. Retrieved October 26, 2019.
  3. Deocampo, Nick (2008). Sine Gabay: A Film Study Guide. Mandaluyong: Anvil Publishing, Inc. pp. 23–24. ISBN 9786214201792.
  4. Mannikka, Eleanor. "Aguila (1980): Plot". IMDb.com. Retrieved 26 October 2019.
  5. Banal, Chelo R. (February 3, 1980). "Aguila". Philippine Panorama. Intramuros: Manila Bulletin. Retrieved November 14, 2019.
  6. Banal, Chelo R. (February 3, 1980). "AT A COST OF P5M AND A CAST OF THOUSANDS, TWO YEARS IN THE MAKING AND THREE HOURS AND A HALF LONG, "AGUILA" SOARS THROUGH THE PRIVATE LIFE OF A FILIPINO AND THE HISTORY OF HIS COUNTRY". Philippine Panorama. Intramuros: Manila Bulletin. Retrieved October 26, 2019.
  7. San Diego, Bayani Jr. (June 1, 2013). "Chanda remembers Tito Eddie, a beloved mentor". Inquirer. Retrieved October 26, 2019.
  8. Abellon, Bam V. (November 12, 2019). "The drama behind Aguila: Walkouts, diva turns and confrontation on the set of FPJ's best film". ANCX. Retrieved November 20, 2019.
  9. Reyes, Isidra (October 6, 2019). "Amalia Fuentes: The heartbreaks and triumphs of a movie queen". ANCX. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  10. "Profiling Grace Poe: 10 Things That Make Her Who She Is". Spot.ph. May 29, 2013. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  11. "Aguila (1980): Trivia". IMDb.com. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  12. Lo, Ricky (April 24, 2017). "Basil Valdez and the soundtrack of his life". The Philippine Star. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  13. "FAMAS Awards (1981)". IMDb.com. Retrieved 26 October 2019.
  14. "Gawad Urian Awards (1981)". IMDb.com. Retrieved 26 October 2019.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.