Africa Women Cup of Nations

The Total Africa Women Cup of Nations (known as the African Women's Championship until 2015) is an international women's football competition held every two years and sanctioned by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). It was first contested in 1991, but was not held biennially until 1998. Nigeria is the most successful nation in the tournament's history, having won a record 11 titles, meaning they have won all but two of the previous tournaments. The two tournaments not won by Nigeria were both won by Equatorial Guinea. For both those times, Equatorial Guinea hosted the competition. Ghana hosted the tournament in 2018.[1]

Africa Women Cup of Nations
Founded1991
RegionAfrica (CAF)
Number of teams8
Current champions Nigeria (11th title)
Most successful team(s) Nigeria (11 titles)
2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations

The competition has served as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup every other tournament since its inception in 1991.

History

In 2000, hosts South Africa met three-time champions Nigeria in the final game of the tournament. After Nigeria finished the first half ahead 1–0, Nigeria's Stella Mbachu scored a second goal in the 72nd minute and the home crowd realized there was no coming back. Supporters began hurling bottles and other debris at officials and Nigerian players. The match was abandoned after three attempts at restarts were all interrupted by further disturbances. Riot police began fighting battles with bottle-throwing supporters about 40 minutes after the goal had been allowed, throwing tear gas into the crowd to break up the disturbance. The game and the tournament were awarded to Nigeria.

Nomination

On 6 August 2015, the CAF Executive Committee decided to change the name of the tournament from the African Women's Championship to the Africa Women Cup of Nations, similar to the men's version, Africa Cup of Nations.[2]

Sponsorship

In July 2016, Total has secured an eight-year sponsorship package from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) to support 10 of its principal competitions.[3] Due to this sponsorship, the Africa Women Cup of Nations is named "Total Africa Women Cup of Nations".

Results

Year Host nation Final Semi-finals Losers
Winner Score Second place
1991
Details
home sites
Nigeria
2 – 0
4 – 0

Cameroon

Guinea
and
Zambia (withdrew)
1995
Details
home sites
Nigeria
4 – 1
7 – 1

South Africa

Angola
and
Ghana
Year Host nation Final Third place match
Winner Score Second place Third place Score Fourth place
1998
Details
 Nigeria
Nigeria
2 – 0
Ghana

DR Congo
3 – 3
(3–1)
penalties

Cameroon
2000
Details
 South Africa
Nigeria
2 – 0
(abd)

South Africa

Ghana
6 – 3
Zimbabwe
2002
Details
 Nigeria
Nigeria
2 – 0
Ghana

Cameroon
3 – 0
South Africa
2004
Details
 South Africa
Nigeria
5 – 0
Cameroon

Ghana
0 – 0
(6–5)
penalties

Ethiopia
2006
Details
 Nigeria
Nigeria
1 – 0
Ghana

South Africa
2 – 2
(5–4)
penalties

Cameroon
2008
Details
 Equatorial Guinea
Equatorial Guinea
2 – 1
South Africa

Nigeria
1 – 1
(5–4)
penalties

Cameroon
2010
Details
 South Africa
Nigeria
4 – 2
Equatorial Guinea

South Africa
2 – 0
Cameroon
2012
Details
 Equatorial Guinea
Equatorial Guinea
4 – 0
South Africa

Cameroon
1 – 0
Nigeria
2014
Details
 Namibia
Nigeria
2 – 0
Cameroon

Ivory Coast
1 – 0
South Africa
2016
Details
 Cameroon[4]
Nigeria
1 – 0
Cameroon

Ghana
1 – 0
South Africa
2018
Details
 Ghana
Nigeria
0 – 0
(4–3)
penalties

South Africa

Cameroon
4 – 2
Mali
2020
Details
TBD[5]

Note: abd – match abandoned in the 73rd minute

Statistics

Performance by nation

Team Winners Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place Total top four
 Nigeria 11 (1991, 1995, 1998*, 2000, 2002*, 2004, 2006*, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018) 1 (2008) 1 (2012) 13
 Equatorial Guinea 2 (2008*, 2012*) 1 (2010) 3
 South Africa 5 (1995, 2000*, 2008, 2012, 2018) 2 (2006, 2010*) 3 (2002, 2014, 2016) 10
 Cameroon 4 (1991, 2004, 2014, 2016*) 3 (2002, 2012, 2018) 4 (1998, 2006, 2008, 2010) 11
 Ghana 3 (1998, 2002, 2006) 4 (1995**, 2000, 2004, 2016) 7
 Guinea 1 (1991**) 1
 Angola 1 (1995**) 1
 DR Congo 1 (1998) 1
 Ivory Coast 1 (2014) 1
 Zimbabwe 1 (2000) 1
 Ethiopia 1 (2004) 1
 Mali 1 (2018) 1
* hosts
** losing semi-finals

General statistics

Pos Team Part Pld W D L GF GA Dif Pts
1  Nigeria 1262526420427+177162
2  South Africa 1146215207675+171
3  Cameroon 12492010196077−1770
4  Ghana 1137186136142+1960
5  Equatorial Guinea 41813234521+2441
6  Zimbabwe 4142571328−1511
7  Mali 61832131748−3111
8  Ivory Coast 283141515010
9  DR Congo 3112361431−179
10  Ethiopia 311146624−187
11  Algeria 4122191132−217
12  Uganda 1311146−24
13  Morocco 26114522−174
14  Namibia 1310235−23
15  Congo 1310236−33
16  Egypt 26105321−183
17  Angola 2502369−32
18  Tunisia 1301235−21
19  Zambia 25014620−141
20  Mozambique 100000000
21  Tanzania 1300338−50
22  Réunion 1300327−50
23  Guinea 1200207−70
24  Senegal 1300307−70
25  Kenya 13003210−80
26  Sierra Leone 12002011−110

Top scorers (Golden boot) by year

Player Country Year of Tournament Number of goals Ref
1998
Mercy Akide  Nigeria 2000 7 goals
Perpetua Nkwocha  Nigeria 2002 4 goals [6]
Perpetua Nkwocha  Nigeria 2004 9 goals
Perpetua Nkwocha  Nigeria 2006 7 goals
Genoveva Añonma
Noko Matlou
 Equatorial Guinea 2008 6 goals [7]
Perpetua Nkwocha  Nigeria 2010 11 goals
Genoveva Añonma  Equatorial Guinea 2012 6 goals
Desire Oparanozie  Nigeria 2014 5 goals
Asisat Oshoala  Nigeria 2016 6 goals
Thembi Kgatlana  South Africa 2018 5 goals

Best player (Golden ball) by year

Player Country Year of Tournament Ref
1998
2000
2002
Perpetua Nkwocha  Nigeria 2004 [8]
Portia Modise  South Africa 2006 [9]
Genoveva Añonma  Equatorial Guinea 2008 [10]
Stella Mbachu  Nigeria 2010 [11]
2012
Asisat Oshoala  Nigeria 2014 [12]
Gabrielle Onguéné  Cameroon 2016 [13]
Thembi Kgatlana  South Africa 2018

Hat-tricks

Participating nations

Team
1991

1995

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020
Years
 Algeria GSGSGSGSGS 5
 Angola SFGS 2
 Cameroon 2nd×4thGS3rd2nd4th4th4th3rd2nd2nd3rd 12
 Congo ×GSq 2
 DR Congo 3rd××GSGS× 3
 Egypt GS××GS 2
 Equatorial Guinea GS1st2nd1stGS 5
 Ethiopia GS4th×GS 3
 Ghana QFSF2nd3rd2nd3rd2ndGSGSGS3rdGS 12
 Guinea SF× 1
 Ivory Coast GS3rd 2
 Kenya xxxxGS 1
 Mali GSGSGSGSGSGS4th 7
 Morocco GSGS 2
 Mozambique GS× 1
 Namibia ×GS 1
 Nigeria 1st1st1st1st1st1st1st3rd1st4th1st1st1st 13
 Réunion GS 1
 Senegal ×GS 1
 Sierra Leone QF×××× 1
 South Africa 2ndGS2nd4thGS3rd2nd3rd2nd4th4th2nd 12
 Tanzania GS 1
 Tunisia GS 1
 Uganda GS×× 1
 Zambia ×QFGSGS 3
 Zimbabwe ×4thGSGS×GS 4
Total (26 Teams)4688888888888
Legend

Most tournaments hosted

HostsNationYear(s)
3 times Nigeria1998, 2002, 2006
 South Africa2000, 2004, 2010
2 times Equatorial Guinea2008, 2012
1 time Namibia2014
 Cameroon2016
 Ghana2018

See also

References

  1. "Football: Le Cameroun va abriter la CAN féminine 2016". cameroon-info.net. Christian Tchapmi. September 24, 2013. Archived from the original on 2014-10-18.
  2. "Decisions of CAF Executive Committee on 6 August 2015". CAF. 9 August 2015.
  3. AfricaNews (2017-04-18). "Total to sponsor CAF competitions for the next eight years". Africanews. Retrieved 2017-04-18.
  4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-22. Retrieved 2014-10-22.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. "Decisions of CAF Executive Committee - 27 & 28 September 2018". CAF. 29 September 2018.
  6. "2002 AWC". Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  7. "Banyana striker crowned Woman Footballer of the Year". Retrieved 26 October 2014.
  8. "Star bio: Nigeria's Perpetua Nkwocha". Retrieved 15 June 2011.
  9. "Portia Modise: Centurion in numbers". Retrieved 20 October 2014.
  10. "SA second Ref". Retrieved 26 October 2014.
  11. "Africa Women Championship". Retrieved 26 October 2014.
  12. http://sportpageng.com/asisat-oshoala-caf-awards-good-for-my-career/
  13. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-12-30. Retrieved 2016-12-29.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.