5-APDI

5-(2-Aminopropyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indene (5-APDI), also known as indanylaminopropane (IAP), IAP (psychedelic), 2-API(2-aminopropylindane), indanametamine, and, incorrectly, as indanylamphetamine,[1] is an entactogen and psychedelic drug of the amphetamine family.[2][3] It has been sold by online vendors through the Internet and has been encountered as a designer drug since 2003,[1] but its popularity and availability has diminished in recent years.

Indanylaminopropane
Clinical data
Other names1-(5-indanyl)-2-aminopropane
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC12H17N
Molar mass175.27 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
ChiralityRacemic mixture
  (verify)

5-APDI acts as a potent and weakly selective serotonin releasing agent (SSRA) with IC50 values of 82 nM, 1,848 nM, and 849 nM for inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, respectively.[2][3] It fully substitutes for MBDB but not amphetamine in trained animals, though it does produce disruption for the latter at high doses.[2]

5-APDI has been classified as a class B drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 since 10 June 2014.

See also

References

  1. Casale JF, McKibben TD, Bozenko JS, Hays PA (2005). "Characterization of the "Indanylamphetamines"". Microgram Journal. 3 (1–2): 3–10. Archived from the original on 2009-03-17. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  2. Monte AP, Marona-Lewicka D, Cozzi NV, Nichols DE (November 1993). "Synthesis and pharmacological examination of benzofuran, indan, and tetralin analogues of 3,4-(methylenedioxy)amphetamine". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 36 (23): 3700–6. doi:10.1021/jm00075a027. PMID 8246240.
  3. Parker MA, Marona-Lewicka D, Kurrasch D, Shulgin AT, Nichols DE (March 1998). "Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of ring-methylated derivatives of 3,4-(methylenedioxy)amphetamine (MDA)". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 41 (6): 1001–5. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.688.9559. doi:10.1021/jm9705925. PMID 9526575.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.