23rd Government of Ireland

The 1992 general election was held on 25 November 1992 and the 27th Dáil first met on 14 December 1992, no candidate was elected as Taoiseach.[1] The outgoing Taoiseach resigned and continued in a caretaker capacity.[2] The 23rd Government of Ireland, the first government of the 27th Dáil, was a coalition of Fianna Fáil (with leader Albert Reynolds as Taoiseach) and the Labour Party (with leader Dick Spring as Tánaiste). It was the first time that these two parties were in government together; on each previous occasion Labour was in government, it was a junior coalition party with Fine Gael. After discussions on a programme for government between Fianna Fáil and the Labour Party, Reynolds was approved as Taoiseach on 12 January 1993, and the members of the government were appointed by the president. The 27th Dáil lasted until 1997, but its first government fell in 1994 after the breakdown of relations between the two parties. It was succeeded by the 24th Government, a coalition of Labour with Fine Gael under John Bruton and Democratic Left under Proinsias De Rossa, with Spring serving again as Tánaiste under Bruton as Taoiseach. This was the only time a government fell and a new government was formed with a different party composition within a single Dáil term.

Government of the 27th Dáil
23rd Government of Ireland
Date formed12 January 1993
Date dissolved15 December 1994
People and organisations
Head of stateMary Robinson
Head of governmentAlbert Reynolds
Deputy head of governmentDick Spring
Bertie Ahern
Total no. of ministers15
Member partiesFF-Lab
Status in legislatureCoalition
Opposition leaderJohn Bruton (Fine Gael)
History
Election(s)1992 general election
Legislature term(s)27th Dáil
Predecessor22nd Government
Successor24th Government

Nomination of Taoiseach vote

12 January 1993
Nomination of Taoiseach vote for Albert Reynolds (FF)

Motion proposed by Máire Geoghegan-Quinn and seconded by Dick Spring
Absolute majority: 84/166
Vote Parties Votes
Y YesFianna Fáil (68), Labour Party (33), Independent Fianna Fáil (1)
102 / 166
NoFine Gael (45), Progressive Democrats (10), Democratic Left (4), Green Party (1)
60 / 166
Not votingIndependent (3), Ceann Comhairle (1)
4 / 166
Source: Oireachtas Debates

Composition

The Ministers of the Government were approved by the Dáil on 12 January 1993.[3]

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Albert Reynolds 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Tánaiste Dick Spring 1993–94 Labour Party
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Minister for Finance Bertie Ahern 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Social Welfare Michael Woods 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Justice Máire Geoghegan-Quinn 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Enterprise and Employment[fn 1] Ruairi Quinn 1993–94 Labour Party
Minister for the Environment Michael Smith 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Defence David Andrews 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for the Marine
Minister for Agriculture, Food and Forestry[fn 2] Joe Walsh 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Tourism and Trade[fn 3] Charlie McCreevy 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Transport, Energy and Communications[fn 4] Brian Cowen 1993–94 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Equality and Law Reform[fn 5] Mervyn Taylor 1993–94 Labour Party
Minister for Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht[fn 6] Michael D. Higgins 1993–94 Labour Party
Minister for Health Brendan Howlin 1993–94 Labour Party
Minister for Education Niamh Bhreathnach 1993–94 Labour Party

Changes 18 November 1994

The Labour Party ministers resigned from government on 17 November 1994.
Albert Reynolds resigned as Taoiseach on 18 November and continued to serve in a caretaker capacity.[4]

Minister for Foreign Affairs Albert Reynolds 1994 Fianna Fáil
Tánaiste Bertie Ahern 1994 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht
Minister for Health Michael Woods 1994 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Equality and Law Reform Máire Geoghegan-Quinn 1994 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Education Michael Smith 1994 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Enterprise and Employment Charlie McCreevy 1994 Fianna Fáil

Notes:

  1. On 21 January 1993 the Department of Industry and Commerce was renamed as the Department of Enterprise and Employment.
  2. On 21 January 1993 the Department of Agriculture and Food was renamed as the Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry.
  3. On 22 January 1993 the Department of Energy was renamed as the Department of Tourism and Trade. On this date, Brian Cowen, who had initially been assigned to this department, was given the portfolio of Minister for Transport, Energy and Communications.
  4. On 22 January 1993 the Department of Tourism, Transport and Communications was renamed as the Department of Transport, Energy and Communications. On this date, Charlie McCreevy, who had initially been assigned to this department, was given the portfolio of Minister for Tourism and Trade.
  5. On 21 January 1993 the Department of Labour was renamed as the Department of Equality and Law Reform.
  6. On 21 January 1993 the Department of the Gaeltacht was renamed as the Department of Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht.

See also

References

  1. "Dáil Éireann debate - Tuesday, 14 Dec 1992: Nomination of Taoiseach". Houses of the Oireachtas. 14 December 1992. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  2. "Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 15 Dec 1992: Resignation of Taoiseach". Houses of the Oireachtas. 15 December 1992. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  3. "Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government: Tuesday, 12 January 1993". Houses of the Oireachtas. 12 January 1993. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  4. "Dáil Éireann debate - Tuesday, 22 Nov 1994: Resignation of Taoiseach and Ministerial Changes: Statement". Houses of the Oireachtas. 22 November 1994. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.