2019 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The 2019 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (also known as UEFA Women's Under-19 Euro 2019) was the 18th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (22nd edition if the Under-18 era is included), the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Scotland, which were selected by UEFA on 9 December 2016, was the host of the tournament.[2]

2019 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
Tournament details
Host countryScotland
Dates16–28 July[1]
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions France (5th title)
Runners-up Germany
Tournament statistics
Matches played15
Goals scored49 (3.27 per match)
Top scorer(s) Melvine Malard
(4 goals)

A total of eight teams played in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 2000 eligible to participate. Starting from this season, up to five substitutions are permitted per team in each match.[3]

Same as previous editions held in odd-numbered years, the tournament acts as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. The top four teams of the tournament qualified for the 2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup as the UEFA representatives.

Spain were the defending champions, but lost 1–3 to France in the Semi-finals after extra-time. France defeated Germany 2–1 in the final to claim its fifth title.

Qualification

A total of 51 UEFA nations entered the competition (including Liechtenstein who entered a competitive women's national team tournament for the first time), and with the hosts Scotland qualifying automatically, the other 50 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining seven spots in the final tournament.[4] The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: Qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2018, and Elite round, which took place in spring 2019.[5]

Qualified teams

The following teams qualified for the final tournament.

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-19 era (since 2002).

Team Method of qualification Appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 ScotlandHosts6th2017 (group stage)Group stage (2005, 2008, 2010, 2014, 2017)
 GermanyElite round Group 1 winners16th2018 (runners-up)Champions (2002, 2006, 2007, 2011)
 BelgiumElite round Group 2 winners2nd2014 (group stage)Group stage (2014)
 NetherlandsElite round Group 3 winners9th2018 (group stage)Champions (2014)
 SpainElite round Group 4 winners14th2018 (champions)Champions (2004, 2017, 2018)
 NorwayElite round Group 5 winners13th2018 (semi-finals)Runners-up (2003, 2008, 2011)
 EnglandElite round Group 6 winners13th2017 (group stage)Champions (2009)
 FranceElite round Group 7 winners15th2018 (group stage)Champions (2003, 2010, 2013, 2016)

Final draw

The final draw was held on 16 April 2019, 12:00 BST (UTC+1), at Barras Art and Design in Glasgow, Scotland.[6] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. There was no seeding, except that the hosts Scotland were assigned to position A1 in the draw.

Venues

The tournament will be held in four venues:

Paisley Perth
St Mirren Park McDiarmid Park
Capacity: 7,937 Capacity: 10,696
3 group matches, semi-final, final 3 group matches, potential play-off
Glasgow Stirling
Firhill Stadium Forthbank Stadium
Capacity: 10,102 Capacity: 3,798
3 group matches, semi-final 3 group matches

Squads

Each national team have to submit a squad of 20 players (Regulations Article 39).[5]

Group stage

The final tournament schedule was announced on 26 April 2019.[7]

The group winners and runners-up advance to the semi-finals and qualify for the 2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup.

Tiebreakers

In the group stage, teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 17.01 and 17.02):[5]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams have the same number of points, and they met in the last round of the group and are tied after applying all criteria above (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage);
  8. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. UEFA coefficient for the qualifying round draw;
  10. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, BST (UTC+1).

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  France 3 2 1 0 8 5 +3 7 Knockout stage and
2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2  Netherlands 3 2 0 1 10 3 +7 6
3  Norway 3 1 1 1 7 8 1 4
4  Scotland 3 0 0 3 1 10 9 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Norway 0–5 Netherlands
Report Smits  2', 44'
Van de Velde  5'
Leuchter  43'
Van de Westeringh  69'
Referee: Ewa Augustyn (Poland)
Scotland 1–2 France
Craig  81' Report Baltimore  60'
Feller  90+1'
Referee: Zuzana Valentová (Slovakia)

Netherlands 1–3 France
Van de Velde  7' Report Feller  5'
Malard  85', 90+3'
Referee: Silvia Domingos (Portugal)
Scotland 0–4 Norway
Report Bragstad  21'
Jøsendal  24'
Olsen  45'
Nygård  45+3'
Referee: Maria Marotta (Italy)

Netherlands 4–0 Scotland
Wilms  8'
Olislagers  33'
Doorn  81', 90'
Report
Referee: Elvira Nurmustafina (Kazakhstan)
France 3–3 Norway
Azzaro  9'
Becho  34'
Malard  77'
Report Bragstad  12', 40'
Hørte  89'
Referee: Ivana Projkovska (Macedonia)

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 3 2 1 0 7 1 +6 7 Knockout stage and
2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2  Spain 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3 7
3  England 3 1 0 2 2 3 1 3
4  Belgium 3 0 0 3 0 8 8 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Spain 2–0 Belgium
Pina  56' (pen.)
Aleixandri  65'
Report
Referee: Maria Marotta (Italy)
England 1–2 Germany
Naz  90+2' Report Kössler  12'
Krumbiegel  32'
Referee: Ivana Projkovska (Macedonia)

England 0–1 Spain
Report Carmona  22'
Referee: Elvira Nurmustafina (Kazakhstan)
Belgium 0–5 Germany
Report Anyomi  35', 58'
Krumbiegel  41'
Kössler  53'
Ebert  81'
Referee: Zuzana Valentová (Slovakia)

Belgium 0–1 England
Report Salmon  26'
Referee: Ewa Augustyn (Poland)
Germany 0–0 Spain
Report
Referee: Silvia Domingos (Portugal)

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary.[5]

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
25 July – Paisley
 
 
 France (a.e.t.)3
 
28 July – Paisley
 
 Spain1
 
 France2
 
25 July – Glasgow
 
 Germany1
 
 Germany3
 
 
 Netherlands1
 

Semi-finals

Germany 3–1 Netherlands
Kössler  19'
Müller  81' (pen.)
Martinez  89'
Report Baijings  61'
Attendance: 301
Referee: Maria Marotta (Italy)

France 3–1 (a.e.t.) Spain
Malard  104'
Becho  110', 114'
Report Del Castillo  120'
Referee: Ewa Augustyn (Poland)

Final

France 2–1 Germany
Baltimore  13'
Lakrar  73'
Report Anyomi  6'
Attendance: 1,135
Referee: Ivana Projkovska (Macedonia)

Goalscorers

There were 49 goals scored in 15 matches, for an average of 3.27 goals per match.

4 goals

  • Melvine Malard

3 goals

  • Vicki Becho
  • Nicole Anyomi
  • Melissa Kössler
  • Emilie Bragstad

2 goals

  • Sandy Baltimore
  • Naomie Feller
  • Paulina Krumbiegel
  • Lisa Doorn
  • Joëlle Smits
  • Jonna van de Velde

1 goal

  • Jessica Naz
  • Ebony Salmon
  • Lorena Azzaro
  • Maëlle Lakrar
  • Lisa Ebert
  • Shekiera Martinez
  • Marie Müller
  • Jill Baijings
  • Romée Leuchter
  • Marisa Olislagers
  • Kirsten van de Westeringh
  • Lynn Wilms
  • Sara Hørte
  • Anna Jøsendal
  • Rikke Nygård
  • Jenny Olsen
  • Emma Craig
  • Laia Aleixandri
  • Olga Carmona
  • Athenea del Castillo
  • Clàudia Pina

Awards

Team of the Tournament[8]

Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
Justine Lerond Laura Donhauser
Sophia Kleinherne
Laia Aleixandri
Maëlle Lakrar
Romée Leuchter
Rosa Márquez
Marie Müller
Sandy Baltimore
Nicole Anyomi
Melvine Malard

Qualified teams for FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The following four teams from UEFA qualify for the 2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup.

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup1
 Germany19 July 2019[9]9 (2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)
 Spain19 July 2019[9]3 (2004, 2016, 2018)
 France22 July 2019[10]7 (2002, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018)
 Netherlands22 July 2019[10]1 (2018)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

International Broadcasters

Television

Up to all 16 live matches and highlights are available on UEFA.tv for all territories around the world.

Note : Live matches on UEFA.tv is not available in UK (Scotland as host, England as participants, and both non-participants (NI and Wales)) (matches not shown on BBC only), France, Germany, Israel, MENA, and USA.[11]

Participating nations

Country Broadcaster
 Scotland (host) BBC
 England
 Belgium VRT (Dutch)
RTBF (French)
 France L'Équipe
 Germany Sport1
 Netherlands NOS
 Norway NRK
 Spain RTVE

Non-participating European nations

Country/Region Broadcaster
 Albania RTSH
 Andorra RTVE (Spanish)
L'Équipe (French)
 Luxembourg
RTBF (French)
VRT (Dutch)
 Armenia APMTV
 Austria ORF
 Belarus Belteleradio
Sport Klub
 Bulgaria BNT
 Czech Republic ČT
 Denmark DR
 Faroe Islands
 Estonia ERR
 Finland Yle
 Hungary MTVA
 Iceland RÚV
 Ireland RTÉ
 Israel Charlton
 Italy RAI
 San Marino
  Vatican City
 Kosovo RTK
 Latvia LTV
 Liechtenstein SRG SSR
  Switzerland
 Lithuania LRT
 Malta PBS
 Northern Ireland BBC
 Poland TVP
 Portugal RTP
 Romania TVR
 Russia Match TV
 Slovakia RTVS
 Sweden SVT
 Turkey TRT
 Ukraine UA:PBC
 Wales BBC

Outside Europe

Country/Regional Broadcaster
 China CCTV
 United States
beIN Sports
 Iran Varzesh TV Farsi

Radio

Participating nations

Country Broadcaster
 United Kingdom (host) BBC
 Belgium VRT (Dutch)
RTBF (French)
 Germany Sport1
 Netherlands NOS
 Norway NRK
 Spain RTVE

Non-participating European nations

Country/Region Broadcaster
 Albania RTSH
 Andorra RTVE (Spanish)
 Armenia HR
 Austria ORF
 Belarus Belteleradio
 Bulgaria BNR
 Czech Republic ČR
 Denmark DR
 Faroe Islands
 Estonia ERR
 Finland Yle
 Hungary MTVA
 Iceland RÚV
 Ireland RTÉ
 Italy RAI
 San Marino
  Vatican City
 Kosovo RTK
 Latvia LR
 Liechtenstein SRG SSR
  Switzerland
 Lithuania LRT
 Luxembourg VRT (Dutch)
RTBF (French)
 Malta PBS
 Poland PR
 Portugal RTP
 Romania RR
 Slovakia RTVS
 Sweden SR
 Turkey TRT
 Ukraine UA:PBC

Outside Europe

Country/Regional Broadcaster
 China CRI
 United States

References

  1. "2018/19 UEFA Women's calendar" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations.
  2. "Scotland and Georgia to host Women's U19 finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 December 2016.
  3. "Amendments to football's Laws of the Game in various UEFA competitions". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 July 2018.
  4. "2018/19 Women's U19 EURO qualifying round draw pots". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2 November 2017.
  5. "Regulations of the UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship, 2018/19" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations.
  6. "Women's Under-19 EURO finals draw". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 16 April 2019. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  7. "2019 #WU19EURO finals schedule". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 26 April 2019. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  8. UEFA.com. "2019 Women's U19 EURO team of the tournament". UEFA.com. Retrieved 2019-07-30.
  9. "Spain and Germany qualify for world finals". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 19 July 2019. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  10. "France, Netherlands complete European quartet". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 22 July 2019. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  11. "Where to watch Women's Under-19 EURO". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 July 2019. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
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