2018 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship

The 2018 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship (also known as UEFA Women's Under-17 Euro 2018) was the 11th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-17 national teams of Europe. Lithuania, which were selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015, hosted the tournament.[2]

2018 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
Tournament details
Host countryLithuania
Dates9–21 May 2018[1]
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Spain (4th title)
Runners-up Germany
Third place Finland
Fourth place England
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored61 (3.81 per match)
Top scorer(s) Shekiera Martinez
(9 goals)

A total of eight teams played in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 2001 eligible to participate. Each match had a duration of 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes with a 15-minute half-time.

Same as previous editions held in even-numbered years, the tournament acted as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. The top three teams of the tournament qualified for the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup in Uruguay as the UEFA representatives.

Spain won their fourth title by beating defending champions Germany 2–0 in the final.[3]

Qualification

A total of 46 UEFA nations entered the competition, and with the hosts Lithuania qualifying automatically, the other 45 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining seven spots in the final tournament.[4] The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: Qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2017, and Elite round, which took place in spring 2018.[5]

Qualified teams

The following teams qualified for the final tournament.[6]

Team Method of qualification Appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 LithuaniaHosts1stDebut
 NetherlandsElite round Group 1 winners3rd2017 (semi-finals)Fourth place (2010), Semi-finals (2017)
 FinlandElite round Group 2 winners1stDebut
 SpainElite round Group 3 winners9th2017 (runners-up)Champions (2010, 2011, 2015)
 ItalyElite round Group 4 winners3rd2016 (group stage)Third place (2014)
 EnglandElite round Group 5 winners6th2017 (group stage)Third place (2016)
 PolandElite round Group 6 winners2nd2013 (champions)Champions (2013)
 GermanyElite round Group 7 winners10th2017 (champions)Champions (2008, 2009, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017)

Final draw

The final draw was held on 6 April 2018, 10:00 EEST (UTC+3), at the Kaunas State Musical Theatre in Kaunas, Lithuania.[7] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. There was no seeding, except that hosts Lithuania were assigned to position A1 in the draw.

Venues

In January 2015 Lithuanian Football Federation announced plans to host championships in Kaunas, Alytus, Marijampolė and Jonava, although Central stadium of Jonava had to improve the conditions in stadium.[8] In early 2018 it was announced that competition would be held in three cities: Alytus, Marijampolė and Šiauliai.[9]

Marijampolė AlytusŠiauliai
Sūduva StadiumAlytus StadiumSavivaldybė Stadium
Capacity: 6,500Capacity: 3,748Capacity: 4,000

Match officials

A total of 6 referees, 8 assistant referees and 2 fourth officials were appointed for the final tournament.[6]

Squads

Each national team submitted a squad of 20 players (Regulations Article 41).[5]

Group stage

The final tournament schedule was confirmed on 12 April 2018.[10]

The group winners and runners-up advance to the semi-finals.

Tiebreakers

In the group stage, teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 17.01 and 17.02):[5]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams have the same number of points, and they met in the last round of the group and are tied after applying all criteria above (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage);
  8. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. UEFA coefficient for the qualifying round draw;
  10. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, EEST (UTC+3).

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 3 2 1 0 12 3 +9 7 Knockout stage
2  Finland 3 2 0 1 7 3 +4 6
3  Netherlands 3 1 1 1 12 4 +8 4
4  Lithuania (H) 3 0 0 3 0 21 21 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Finland 1–2 Germany
  • Vuorinen  53'
Report
  • Martinez  71', 80'
Referee: Irena Velevačkoska (Macedonia)
Lithuania 0–9 Netherlands
Report
  • Ubartaitė  2' (o.g.)
  • Van de Westeringh  10', 17', 79'
  • Van de Velde  15'
  • Leuchter  25', 75'
  • Tromp  29' (pen.)
  • Foederer  60'
Referee: Hristiana Guteva (Bulgaria)

Germany 2–2 Netherlands
  • Martinez  73'
  • Donhauser  80+4'
Report
  • Hendriks  28'
  • Grant  52'
Referee: Désirée Grundbacher (Switzerland)
Lithuania 0–4 Finland
Report
  • Huhta  25', 39', 63'
  • Koivisto  52' (pen.)

Germany 8–0 Lithuania
  • Corley  35'
  • Fuso  44'
  • Weidauer  47', 80+2'
  • Martinez  56', 57', 65'
  • Fudalla  76'
Report
Referee: Kateryna Usova (Ukraine)
Netherlands 1–2 Finland
  • Leuchter  77' (pen.)
Report
  • Juvonen  50'
  • Vuorinen  73'
Referee: Frida Nielsen (Denmark)

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 3 2 1 0 7 1 +6 7 Knockout stage
2  England 3 1 1 1 7 4 +3 4
3  Italy 3 0 2 1 0 4 4 2
4  Poland 3 0 2 1 2 7 5 2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Italy 0–0 Spain
Report
Referee: Frida Nielsen (Denmark)
Poland 2–2 England
  • Filipczak  48'
  • Tomasiak  80+2'
Report
  • Park  58'
  • McKenzie  68'

Spain 2–1 England
  • Arana  4'
  • Navarro  70'
Report
Referee: Kateryna Usova (Ukraine)
Poland 0–0 Italy
Report
Referee: Hristiana Guteva (Bulgaria)

Spain 5–0 Poland
  • Navarro  8' (pen.), 34'
  • Hernández  40'
  • Esteve  61'
  • Arana  66'
Report
Referee: Désirée Grundbacher (Switzerland)
England 4–0 Italy
Report
Referee: Irena Velevačkoska (Macedonia)

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, penalty shoot-out is used to decide the winner if necessary (no extra time is played).[5]

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
18 May – Alytus
 
 
 Germany8
 
21 May – Marijampolė
 
 England0
 
 Germany0
 
18 May – Marijampolė
 
 Spain2
 
 Spain1
 
 
 Finland0
 
World Cup play-off
 
 
21 May – Alytus
 
 
 England1
 
 
 Finland2

Semi-finals

Winners qualify for 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. Losers enter the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup play-off.

Germany 8–0 England
  • Rendell  23' (o.g.)
  • Martinez  27', 44', 61'
  • Köster  30', 72'
  • Fuso  50'
  • Fudalla  64'
Report
Referee: Hristiana Guteva (Bulgaria)

Spain 1–0 Finland
  • Navarro  52'
Report
Referee: Lucie Šulcová (Czech Republic)

FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup play-off

Winner qualifies for 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

England 1–2 Finland
Report
  • Huhta  46'
  • Kantanen  61'
Referee: Frida Nielsen (Denmark)

Final

Germany 0–2 Spain
Report
  • Navarro  46', 73'
Referee: Désirée Grundbacher (Switzerland)

Qualified teams for FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The following three teams from UEFA qualified for the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.[11]

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup1
 Germany18 May 20185 (2008, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016)
 Spain18 May 20183 (2010, 2014, 2016)
 Finland21 May 20180 (debut)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Goalscorers

Note: Goals scored in the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup play-off are included in this list, but are not counted by UEFA for statistical purposes.

9 goals
  • Shekiera Martinez
6 goals
  • Eva María Navarro
4 goals
3 goals
  • Romée Leuchter
  • Kirsten van de Westeringh
2 goals
  • Jess Park (including 1 in play-off)
  • Aino Vuorinen
  • Vanessa Fudalla
  • Ivana Fuso
  • Leonie Köster
  • Sophie Weidauer
  • Paula Arana
1 goal
  • Annabel Blanchard
  • Paris McKenzie
  • Kaisa Juvonen
  • Jenni Kantanen (in play-off)
  • Vilma Koivisto
  • Gia Corley
  • Laura Donhauser
  • Dana Foederer
  • Chasity Grant
  • Gwyneth Hendriks
  • Nikita Tromp
  • Jonna van de Velde
  • Paulina Filipczak
  • Paulina Tomasiak
  • Aida Esteve
  • Paola Hernández
1 own goal
  • Kayla Rendell (playing against Germany)
  • Laura Ubartaitė (playing against The Netherlands)

Source: UEFA.com[12]

Team of the tournament

The UEFA technical observers selected the following 11 players for the team of the tournament (previously a squad of 18 players were selected):[13]

Goalkeeper
  • Anna Koivunen
Defenders
  • Ana Tejada
  • Greta Stegemann
  • Nana Yang
Midfielders
  • Paola Hernández
  • Ivana Fuso
  • Vanessa Fudalla
  • Jess Park
  • Kirsten van de Westeringh
Forwards
  • Eva María Navarro
  • Shekiera Martinez

References

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