2014 UEFA European Under-19 Championship

The 2014 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 13th edition of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship since its reclassification from an under-18 event in 2002, and the 63rd since the tournament was created in 1948. Hungary was chosen to host the final tournament,[2] which was staged from 19 to 31 July 2014 in four cities – Budapest, Felcsút, Győr and Pápa. It was the second time (first in the under-19 era) that the country held this tournament, having previously hosted it in 1990.[3] Players born after 1 January 1995 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2014 UEFA European Under-19 Championship
2014-es U19-es labdarúgó-Európa-bajnokság
Tournament details
Host country Hungary
Dates19–31 July
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Germany (3rd title)
Runners-up Portugal
Tournament statistics
Matches played15
Goals scored41 (2.73 per match)
Attendance32,106 (2,140 per match)
Top scorer(s) Davie Selke
(6 goals)
Best player(s) Davie Selke[1]

Qualification matches began in September 2013 and concluded in June 2014, with seven teams joining the hosts in the final tournament. Among them were the defending champions, Serbia, who defeated France 1–0 in the previous final to secure their first-ever title in UEFA competitions.

The best three teams from each group at the final tournament qualified for the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup in New Zealand.[3]

Germany defeated Portugal 1–0 in the final to capture their third title.[4]

Venues

Map of the final tournament venues

The final tournament matches were held in four stadium venues located in four cities:[3]

Stadium Location Capacity Matches Ref
Ferenc Szusza Stadium Budapest 12,700 3 group stage matches, 1 semi-final and final [5]
Pancho Arena Felcsút 3,672 3 group stage matches and 1 semi-final [6]
ETO Park Győr 13,772 3 group stage matches [7]
Perutz Stadion Pápa 3,118 3 group stage matches [8]

Qualification

Qualification for the final tournament occurred in two phases: a qualifying round and an elite round. During these rounds, 53 national teams competed to determine the seven teams that would join the automatically qualified host team, Hungary.[9]

The qualifying round was played between 6 September and 19 November 2013, following a draw that took place on 5 December 2012 at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. According to the UEFA under-19 national team coefficient ranking,[10] the top seeded team, Spain, was given a bye to the elite round, whereas the remaining 52 teams were divided into two pots and drawn into 13 groups of four teams. Each group included two teams from both pots and was contested as a round-robin tournament, hosted by one of the group teams. The group winners and runners-up, along with the best third-placed team, qualified for the next round.[9]

The elite round was played between 24 May and 10 June 2014 and was contested by the 27 teams advancing from the qualifying round plus Spain. The draw took place on 28 November 2013 at the UEFA headquarters and allocated the 28 teams – previously arranged into four seeding pots according to their qualifying round coefficient (Spain were automatically seeded in the first pot) – into seven groups of four. Each group was contested similarly to the qualifying round, with the seven group winners securing qualification for the final tournament.[11]

Qualified teams

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament:[12]

Country Qualified as Previous appearances in tournament1
 HungaryHosts 1 (2008)
 UkraineGroup 1 winner 2 (2004, 2009)
 BulgariaGroup 2 winner 1 (2008)
 IsraelGroup 3 winner 0 (debut)
 SerbiaGroup 4 winner 6 (20052, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013)
 GermanyGroup 5 winner 5 (2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008)
 AustriaGroup 6 winner 4 (2003, 2006, 2007, 2010)
 PortugalGroup 7 winner 6 (2003, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2013)
1 Only counted appearances for under-19 era (bold indicates champion for that year, while italic indicates hosts)

Squads

Match officials

UEFA named six referees and eight assistant referees to officiate matches at the final tournament. Additionally, two referees from the host nation were chosen as fourth officials.[13]

Group stage

The draw for the group stage was held on 19 June 2014 at the Pancho Arena in Felcsút, and was conducted by the UEFA Youth and Amateur Football Committee chairman, Jim Boyce, who was assisted by former Hungarian national team coach and final tournament ambassador Kálmán Mészöly.[14]

The eight finalists were drawn into two groups of four teams (as hosts, Hungary were seeded in group A), where they played matches against each other in a round-robin system. The top two teams from each group advanced to the semi-finals.[12]

Tie-breaking

If two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied:[15]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the matches played between the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the matches played between the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the matches played between the teams in question;

If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still had an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 were reapplied exclusively to the matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure did not lead to a decision, criteria 4 to 7 were applied.

  1. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  2. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  3. Respect Fair play ranking of the teams in question (final tournament);
  4. Drawing of lots.

If only two teams were tied (according to criteria 1–7) after having met in the last match of the group stage, their ranking would be determined by a penalty shoot-out.

Key to colours in group tables
Group winners and runners-up advanced to the semi-finals and qualified for the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup
Third-placed teams qualified for the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup

All times are in Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00).[16]

Group A

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Portugal 3 3 0 0 11 2 +9 9
 Austria 3 2 0 1 7 3 +4 6
 Hungary 3 1 0 2 4 10 6 3
 Israel 3 0 0 3 1 8 7 0
Source:
Portugal 3–0 Israel
Lopes  39', 78'
Silva  64'
Report
Attendance: 397
Hungary 1–3 Austria
Varga  60' Report Bytyqi  15' (pen.)
Blutsch  18'
Michorl  48'

Austria 3–0 Israel
Bytyqi  28' (pen.)
Grillitsch  42'
Grubeck  73'
Report
Attendance: 456
Referee: Enea Jorgji (Albania)
Hungary 1–6 Portugal
Mervó  73' Report Rodrigues  32' (pen.)
Silva  45', 66', 89', 90+2'
Martins  75'
Attendance: 3,695
Referee: Tore Hansen (Norway)

Israel 1–2 Hungary
Hugy  36' Report Kalmár  25'
Balogh  39'
Austria 1–2 Portugal
Grillitsch  46' Report Podstawski  41'
Baldé  86'

Group B

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Germany 3 2 1 0 7 2 +5 7
 Serbia 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
 Ukraine 3 1 1 1 2 3 1 4
 Bulgaria 3 0 0 3 0 5 5 0
Source:
Ukraine 1–1 Serbia
Burda  1' Report Maksimović  7'
Attendance: 300
Bulgaria 0–3 Germany
Report Selke  1', 56'
Syhre  28'
Attendance: 500

Germany 2–2 Serbia
Selke  39'
Stark  90+1'
Report Maksimović  32'
Jović  41'
Attendance: 1,500
Bulgaria 0–1 Ukraine
Report Tankovskiy  89'
Attendance: 300

Serbia 1–0 Bulgaria
Mandić  90' Report
Attendance: 200
Referee: Enea Jorgji (Albania)
Germany 2–0 Ukraine
Selke  3', 66' Report
Attendance: 650
Referee: Tore Hansen (Norway)

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary.[15]

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
28 July
 
 
 Portugal (p)0 (4)
 
31 July
 
 Serbia0 (3)
 
 Portugal0
 
28 July
 
 Germany1
 
 Germany4
 
 
 Austria0
 

Semifinals

Germany 4–0 Austria
Selke  20'
Stendera  30'
Öztunalı  58'
Mukhtar  68'
Report

Final

Portugal 0–1 Germany
Report Mukhtar  39'

Goalscorers

6 goals
5 goals
2 goals
1 goal

Team of the tournament

Source: UEFA Technical Report[17]

Golden player: Davie Selke[18]

References

  1. "UEFA.com Golden Player 2014: Davie Selke". UEFA.com.
  2. "Germany, Greece and Hungary given U19 finals". UEFA.com (Union of European Football Associations). 20 March 2012. Retrieved 28 May 2014.
  3. "2014 final tournament: Hungary". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations). Retrieved 28 May 2014.
  4. "Germany edge out Portugal for second U19 crown". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations). Retrieved 31 July 2014.
  5. "Szusza Ferenc Stadion, Budapest". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  6. "Puskás Akadémia Pancho Aréna, Felcsut". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  7. "ETO Park Stadion, Gyor". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  8. "Perutz Stadion, Papa". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  9. "2013/14 U19 qualifying round draw seedings". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 August 2013. Retrieved 10 June 2014.
  10. "2013/14 UEFA European Under-17 and Under-19 Championships Qualifying Draws" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 10 June 2014.
  11. "Spain lead U19 elite round seeds". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 22 November 2013. Retrieved 10 June 2014.
  12. "Lineup complete for Under-19 finals in Hungary". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 June 2014. Retrieved 10 June 2014.
  13. "Match officials". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  14. "Former champions block Serbia's path". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 19 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  15. "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship 2013/14" (PDF). UEFA.com. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  16. "Match schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 26 June 2014. Retrieved 29 June 2014.
  17. "Team of the Tournament". UEFA. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  18. "2014: Davie Selke". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 September 2014. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
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