1997 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships

The 1997 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships was the 61st such event sanctioned by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). Teams representing 36 countries participated in several levels of competition, while three other teams competed in an exhibition tournament to gain experience before joining on an official basis in the 1998 competition. The competition also served as qualifications for group placements in the 1998 competition.

1997 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships
Tournament details
Host country Finland
Dates26 April – 14 May 1997
Teams12
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Canada (21st title)
Runner-up  Sweden
Third place  Czech Republic
Fourth place Russia
Tournament statistics
Matches played52
Goals scored302 (5.81 per match)
Attendance526,000 (10,115 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Martin Procházka 14 points
1996

The top Championship Group tournament took place in Finland from 26 April to 14 May 1997, with matches played in Helsinki, Tampere and Turku. Twelve teams took part, with the first round being split into two teams of six, and the six best teams going to a further group stage. Canada beat Sweden in the final game, best of three, where they won 2–1 in games, and became world champions for the 21st time.

World Championship Group A (Finland)

First Round

Group 1

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Czech Republic540118 - 098
2 Finland540125 - 098
3 Russia531119 - 167
4 Slovakia511310 - 143
5 France510413 - 262
6 Germany510404 - 152
26 AprilCzech Republic 2-1 Germany
26 AprilFinland 6-1 France
27 AprilRussia 2-2 Slovakia
27 AprilFinland 1-2 Czech Republic
28 AprilSlovakia 5-3 France
28 AprilGermany 1-5 Russia
29 AprilFinland 6-0 Germany
30 AprilRussia 5-4 France
30 AprilCzech Republic 3-1 Slovakia
1 MayCzech Republic 2-3 Russia
2 MayFrance 2-1 Germany
2 MayFinland 5-2 Slovakia
3 MayFrance 3-9 Czech Republic
3 MaySlovakia 0-1 Germany
3 MayFinland 7-4 Russia

Group 2

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Sweden541020 - 089
2 Canada531123 - 117
3 United States530214 - 156
4 Latvia512218 - 174
5 Italy511312 - 213
6 Norway501407 - 221
26 AprilCanada 7-0 Norway
26 AprilSweden 5-3 Italy
27 AprilUnited States 5-4 Latvia
27 AprilSweden 7-2 Canada
28 AprilItaly 5-4 Latvia
28 AprilNorway 1-3 United States
29 AprilSweden 4-1 Norway
30 AprilCanada 3-3 Latvia
30 AprilUnited States 4-2 Italy
1 MayCanada 5-1 United States
2 MayItaly 2-2 Norway
2 MaySweden 1-1 Latvia
3 MayItaly 0-6 Canada
3 MayUnited States 1-3 Sweden
3 MayLatvia 6-3 Norway

Second Round 1–6 Place

Teams that had played each other in the first round carried those results forward. First and second place played off for gold, third and fourth for bronze.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Sweden540117 - 098
2 Canada530213 - 146
3 Russia521213 - 135
4 Czech Republic520312 - 124
5 Finland520312 - 124
6 United States511307 - 143
5 MayCzech Republic 3-4 United States
5 MaySweden 1-4 Russia
6 MayFinland 0-1 Canada
6 MayRussia 1-1 United States
7 MayCanada 3-5 Czech Republic
7 MayFinland 2-5 Sweden
8 MayCzech Republic 0-1 Sweden
9 MayCanada 2-1 Russia
9 MayUnited States 0-2 Finland

Consolation Round 7–12 Place

Teams that had played each other in the first round carried those results forward. Last place was not relegated to Group B, instead they had to play against three qualifiers from Group B for the last two openings in the 1998 Group A tournament. This was Germany's lowest finish since 1965.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
7 Latvia540129 - 148
8 Italy531123 - 137
9 Slovakia530215 - 136
10 France520312 - 234
11 Germany520308 - 174
12 Norway501411 - 181

Norway was sent to 1998 Group A Qualifier.

6 MaySlovakia 2-1 Norway
6 MayLatvia 8-0 Germany
7 MayNorway 3-4 France
7 MayItaly 5-2 Germany
8 MayItaly 3-4 Slovakia
8 MayLatvia 6-2 France
9 MayGermany 4-2 Norway
10 MaySlovakia 4-5 Latvia
10 MayFrance 1-8 Italy

Final Round

Match for third place

10 MayCzech Republic 4–3
(2-1, 1-0, 1-2)
 RussiaHelsinki
Attendance: 13,249

Final

11 MaySweden 3 – 2
(1-1, 1-0, 1-1)
 CanadaHelsinki
Attendance: 13,220

13 MaySweden 1 – 3
(0-0, 1-2, 0-1)
 CanadaHelsinki
Attendance: 13,316

14 MayCanada 2 – 1
(1-0, 1-0, 0-1)
 SwedenHelsinki
Attendance: 13,181

World Championship Group B (Poland)

Played 12–21 April in Katowice (Spodek) and Sosnowiec (Stadion Zimowy).[2] With the announcement that Group A would be expanding from twelve to sixteen nations, Group B would also undergo significant changes. The winner and next year's host (Switzerland) were promoted. In addition, the remaining three best teams would win the opportunity to play in a qualifying tournament against the last place team from Group A, where the top two would be included in the Group A tournament.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
13 Belarus770048 - 2114
14 Kazakhstan751131 - 2111
15  Switzerland732226 - 228
16 Austria723222 - 227
17 Poland722319 - 246
18 Great Britain721428 - 225
19 Netherlands721421 - 385
20 Denmark700719 - 440

Belarus, as winner, was promoted to Group A. Switzerland, as host, was also promoted to Group A. Kazakhstan, Austria, and Poland were all promoted to the Qualifying tournament for Group A, along with Norway. No one was relegated.

12 AprilSwitzerland  8-3 Netherlands
12 AprilPoland 4-3 Great Britain
12 AprilKazakhstan 5-3 Austria
12 AprilBelarus 9-3 Denmark
13 AprilSwitzerland  6-4 Denmark
13 AprilKazakhstan 4-2 Great Britain
13 AprilAustria 2-2 Netherlands
13 AprilPoland 2-7 Belarus
15 AprilBelarus 4-3 Kazakhstan
15 AprilPoland 0-0  Switzerland
15 AprilAustria 3-1 Denmark
15 AprilGreat Britain 8-2 Netherlands
16 AprilKazakhstan 5-2  Switzerland
16 AprilGreat Britain 9-1 Denmark
16 AprilPoland 4-6 Austria
16 AprilBelarus 10-2 Netherlands
18 AprilSwitzerland  5-6 Belarus
18 AprilPoland 3-3 Kazakhstan
18 AprilAustria 2-2 Great Britain
18 AprilNetherlands 6-4 Denmark
20 AprilBelarus 6-4 Austria
20 AprilKazakhstan 6-4 Denmark
20 AprilSwitzerland  3-2 Great Britain
20 AprilPoland 1-3 Netherlands
21 AprilBelarus 6-2 Great Britain
21 AprilKazakhstan 5-3 Netherlands
21 AprilSwitzerland  2-2 Austria
21 AprilPoland 5-2 Denmark

World Championship Group C (Estonia)

Played 22–28 March in Tallinn and Kohtla-Järve. Along with the expansion of Group A, a provision was made to allow the best "Far East" team to qualify directly. Beginning in 1999 there would be a tournament to decide who that would be. But for now, the top placing "Far East" hockey nation was able to proceed directly from Group C to Group A. For this year, as well, promotion to Group B was available to the top three European teams, and there was no relegation.[1]

First Round

Group 1

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Japan321011 - 035
2 Estonia312018 - 124
3 Hungary311111 - 113
4 Lithuania300305 - 190
22 MarchJapan 3-0 Lithuania
22 MarchHungary 5-5 Estonia
23 MarchHungary 5-0 Lithuania
23 MarchEstonia 2-2 Japan
25 MarchJapan 6-1 Hungary
25 MarchLithuania 5-11 Estonia

Group 2

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Ukraine330017 - 036
2 Slovenia320118 - 044
3 Romania310206 - 172
4 China300307 - 240
22 MarchUkraine 7-1 China
22 MarchRomania 0-5 Slovenia
23 MarchSlovenia 11-1 China
23 MarchRomania 0-7 Ukraine
25 MarchChina 5-6 Romania
25 MarchUkraine 3-2 Slovenia

Final Round 21–24 Place

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
21 Ukraine321007 - 055
22 Slovenia311109 - 073
23 Estonia302106 - 072
24 Japan302105 - 082

Japan was promoted to Group A as the "Far East Qualifier", Ukraine, Slovenia, and Estonia were all promoted to Group B.

27 MarchJapan 1-4 Slovenia
27 MarchEstonia 1-2 Ukraine
28 MarchJapan 2-2 Ukraine
28 MarchEstonia 3-3 Slovenia

Consolation Round 25–28 Place

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
25 Romania330015 - 086
26 Hungary320112 - 054
27 China310214 - 162
28 Lithuania300306 - 180
27 MarchHungary 7-3 China
27 MarchRomania 7-3 Lithuania
28 MarchChina 6-3 Lithuania
28 MarchHungary 0-2 Romania

World Championship Group D (Andorra)

Played 7–14 April in Canillo. With Group A expansion, four nations were promoted to Group C.

First Round

Group 1

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Croatia320110 - 044
2 South Korea320112 - 084
3 Belgium320107 - 074
4 Australia300309 - 190

Croatia and South Korea were promoted to Group C.

7 AprilAustralia 2-7 Croatia
8 AprilBelgium 1-4 South Korea
10 AprilBelgium 4-2 Australia
10 AprilCroatia 2-0 South Korea
11 AprilAustralia 5-8 South Korea
11 AprilBelgium 2-1 Croatia

Group 2

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Spain320117 - 134
2 Yugoslavia311111 - 113
3 Bulgaria311110 - 103
4 Israel310210 - 142

Spain and Yugoslavia were promoted to Group C.

7 AprilSpain 4-5 Bulgaria
8 AprilIsrael 3-4 Yugoslavia
10 AprilBulgaria 2-2 Yugoslavia
10 AprilSpain 7-3 Israel
11 AprilBulgaria 3-4 Israel
11 AprilSpain 6-5 Yugoslavia

Final Round 29–32 Place

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
29 Croatia321008 - 055
30 South Korea320107 - 034
31 Spain310210 - 112
32 Yugoslavia301207 - 131
13 AprilSpain 3-4 Croatia
13 AprilYugoslavia 0-5 South Korea
14 AprilCroatia 2-2 Yugoslavia
14 AprilSpain 1-2 South Korea

Consolation Round 33–36 Place

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
33 Israel320112 - 144
34 Australia311113 - 103
35 Bulgaria311110 - 093
36 Belgium310209 - 112
13 AprilBulgaria 3-3 Australia
13 AprilBelgium 3-5 Israel
14 AprilIsrael 3-8 Australia
14 AprilBelgium 2-4 Bulgaria

Unofficial Group E

Three men's teams that were going to be included in Group D in 1998 played a tournament in Ankara Turkey from 19 to 24 February 1997.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 South Africa431036 - 87
2 New Zealand421123 - 205
3 Turkey400414 - 450
Turkey 1-14 South Africa
Turkey 7-9 New Zealand
South Africa 4-4 New Zealand
South Africa 5-1 New Zealand
Turkey 2-13 South Africa
Turkey 4-9 New Zealand

Ranking and statistics

 


 1997 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Canada
21st title

Tournament Awards

Final standings

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

 Canada
 Sweden
 Czech Republic
4 Russia
5 Finland
6 United States
7 Latvia
8 Italy
9 Slovakia
10 France
11 Germany
12 Norway

Scoring leaders

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Martin Procházka97714+104F
Vladimír Vůjtek87714+1131F
Michael Nylander116511+16F
Pavel Patera93811+84F
Roger Dubé87310−102F
Oleg Znaroks83710−46F
Gates Orlando8549−114F
Bruno Zarrillo8549−14F
Harijs Vītoliņš8459−34F
Travis Green11369+212F

Source:

Leading goaltenders

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 40% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Jarmo Myllys357101.68.9381
Artūrs Irbe300102.00.9301
Roman Čechmánek479172.13.9290
Maxim Mikhailovsky359122.01.9290
Mike Rosati239123.01.9250

Source:

Citations

References

See also: World Juniors, Women's Championships

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.