1989 Japanese House of Councillors election

Elections for the Japanese House of Councillors were held in Japan on 23 July 1989.

1989 Japanese House of Councillors election

23 July 1989

126 (of the 252) seats in the House of Councillors
127 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
 
Leader Sōsuke Uno Takako Doi Koshiro Ishida
Party Liberal Democratic Socialist Komeito
Last election 143 seats, 38.6% 42 seats, 17.2% 24 seats, 13.0%
Seats after 109 66 22
Seat change 34 24 2
Popular vote 15,343,455 19,688,252 6,097,971
Percentage 27.3% 35.1% 10.9%
Swing 11.3% 17.9% 2.1%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
 
Leader Kenji Miyamoto Eiichi Nagasue
Party Communist Democratic Reform Democratic Socialist
Last election 16 seats, 9.5% New 12 seats, 6.9%
Seats after 14 11 8
Seat change 2 11 4
Popular vote 3,954,408 2,726,419
Percentage 7.0% 4.9%
Swing 2.5% 2.0%

President of the House
of Councillors before election

Yoshihiro Tsuchiya
Liberal Democratic

Elected President of the House
of Councillors

Yoshihiro Tsuchiya
Liberal Democratic

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The election result was a setback for ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) because of the Recruit scandal, the introduction of a 3% consumption tax, and the involvement of Prime Minister Uno Sōsuke in a sex scandal.

This is the first time that the LDP lost the majority in the House of Councillors. Since 1989, due to the House of Councillors without a simple majority, LDP needs to cooperate and form coalitions with other parties.

The Japan Socialist Party-led opposition won a majority of seats.

Election results

Party PR seats District seats Total Elected 1989 Total
Liberal Democratic Party 15 21 36 109
Japan Socialist Party 20 26 46 66
Rengō no kai 0 11 11 12
Komeito 6 4 10 20
Communist Party 4 1 5 14
Democratic Socialist Party 2 1 3 8
Others 3 2 5 23
Independents 0 10 10
Total 50 76 126 252

References


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