1989 Chilean constitutional referendum

Background

If approved, 54 constitutional reforms were to be implemented, among which the reform of the way that the Constitution itself could be reformed, the restriction of state of emergency dispositions, the affirmation of political pluralism, the strengthening of constitutional rights as well as of the democratic principle and participation to the political life.

Results

Choice Votes %
For6,069,44091.25
Against581,6158.74
Invalid/blank votes431,024
Total7,082,079100
Registered voters/turnout7,556,61393.73
Source: Chilean Electoral Service.

By region

Region For Against
Votes % Votes %
I Tarapacá 147,660 92.67 11,681 7.33
II Antofagasta 179,540 91.88 15,780 8.12
III Atacama 90,123 89.41 10,670 10.59
IV Coquimbo 201,925 88.49 26,269 11.51
V Valparaíso 666,412 92.52 53,907 7.48
VI O'Higgins 321,780 90.33 34,456 9.67
VII Maule 382,577 89.12 46,720 10.88
VIII Biobío 774,111 89.32 92,564 10.68
IX Araucanía 322,120 85.21 55,889 14.79
X Los Lagos 404,110 88.46 52,713 11.54
XI Aysén 32,473 89.69 3733 10.31
XII Magallanes 71,805 92.03 6222 7.97
RM Metropolitana 2,474,804 93.54 170,913 6.46
Total6,069,44091.25581,6158.74

Aftermath

Following the approval of the constitutional amendments, general elections were held in December.[1] Patricio Aylwin was elected President with 55% of the vote,[3] whilst the Concert of Parties for Democracy won a majority of elected seats in both chambers of the National Congress.

Pinochet left office on 11 March 1990, transferring power to the new democratically elected president.

References

  1. Nohlen, D (2005) Elections in the Americas: A data handbook, Volume II, p262 ISBN 978-0-19-928358-3
  2. Nohlen, p268
  3. Nohlen, p288


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