1984 in spaceflight

The following is an outline of 1984 in spaceflight.

1984 in spaceflight
National firsts
Space traveller Canada
 India
Rockets
Maiden flightsAriane 3
Atlas G
Space Shuttle Discovery
RetirementsTitan 24B
Crewed flights
Orbital8
Total travellers37

Launches

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January

31 January
03:08
Titan 34D/Transtage Cape Canaveral LC-40
OPS-0441 (Vortex 4) NRO High Earth SIGINTIn orbitSuccessful

February

3 February
13:00
Space Shuttle Challenger Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-41-B NASA Low Earth Satellite deployment11 February
12:15
Successful
Westar 6 Western Union Intended: Geosynchronous
Actual: Low Earth
Communications16 November
11:59
Deployment failure
Palapa B2 Telkom Indonesia Intended: Geosynchronous
Actual: Low Earth
Communications16 November
11:59
Deployment failure
SPAS-1A NASA Low Earth (Challenger) Microgravity research11 February
12:15
Successful
Manned orbital flight with five astronauts; first use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit and the first Space Shuttle landing at the Kennedy Space Center.
PAM failures led to Westar 6 and Palapa B2 being stranded in Low Earth orbit. The satellites were subsequently retrieved by Space Shuttle Discovery during mission STS-51-A in November and were returned to Earth for refurbishment.
Westar 6 was sold to AsiaSat and renamed AsiaSat 1, and launched by a Chinese Long March 3 carrier rocket on 7 April 1990.
Palapa B2 was renamed Palapa B2R and was launched by an American Delta II 6925-8 carrier rocket on 13 April 1990.
5 February
18:44
Atlas H Vandenberg SLC-3E
OPS-8737 (NOSS 7) US Navy Low Earth SIGINTIn orbitSuccessful
8 February
12:07
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Soyuz T-10 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Salyut 7 EO-311 April
10:48
Successful
Manned orbital flight with three cosmonauts
21 February
06:46
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Progress 19 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Logistics1 April
18:18
Successful

March

5 March
00:50
Ariane 1 Kourou ELA CNES
Intelsat 508 Intelsat Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful

April

3 April
13:08
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Soyuz T-11 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Salyut 7 EP-32 October
10:57
Successful
Manned orbital flight with three cosmonauts including the first Indian space traveller
6 April
13:58
Space Shuttle Challenger Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-41-C NASA Low Earth Satellite deployment and repair13 April
13:38
Successful
LDEF NASA Low Earth Material science20 January 1990
06:35
Successful
Manned orbital flight with five astronauts; Solar Max repair mission
LDEF retrieved by Space Shuttle Columbia during mission STS-32 in January 1990.
14 April
16:52
Titan 34D/Transtage Cape Canaveral LC-40
OPS-7641 (DSP-12) US Air Force Geosynchronous Early warningIn orbitSuccessful
15 April
08:12
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Progress 20 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Logistics7 May
00:32
Successful
17 April
18:45
Titan 24B Vandenberg SLC-4W
OPS-8424 (KH-8-54) NRO Sun-synchronous Reconnaissance13 AugustSuccessful
Final flight of Titan 24B and the final KH-8 spacecraft

May

7 May
22:47
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Progress 21 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Logistics26 May
15:00
Successful
23 May
01:33
Ariane 1 Kourou ELA Arianespace
Spacenet F1 Spacenet Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
28 May
14:12
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 31/6
Progress 22 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Logistics15 July
18:52
Successful

June

9 June
23:03
Atlas G Cape Canaveral LC-36B
Intelsat 509 Intelsat Intended: Geosynchronous
Achieved: Low Earth
Communications24 OctoberLaunch Failure
Maiden flight of Atlas G
Upper stage malfunction left payload in a useless orbit
13 June
11:37
Atlas E/SGS-2 Vandenberg SLC-3W
USA-1 (GPS-9) US Air Force Medium Earth NavigationIn orbitSuccessful
25 June
18:47
Titan 34D Vandenberg SLC-4E
USA-2 (KH-9-19) NRO Sun-synchronous Reconnaissance18 OctoberSuccessful
USA-3 (SSF-D-5) NRO Sun-synchronous ELINTIn orbitSuccessful

July

17 July
17:40
Soyuz-U2 Baikonur Site 31/6
Soyuz T-12 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Salyut 7 EP-429 July
12:55
Successful
Manned orbital flight with three cosmonauts
First manned flight of Soyuz-U2

August

4 August
13:32
Ariane 3 Kourou ELA Arianespace
Eutelsat 1F2 Eutelsat Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Telecom 1A France Télécom Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Maiden flight of Ariane 3
Eutelsat 1F2 retired in 1993
14 August
06:28
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 1/5
Progress 23 Low Earth (Salyut 7) Logistics28 August
01:28
Successful
28 August
18:03
Titan 34B Vandenberg SLC-4W
USA-4 (SDS-1-5) US Air Force Molniya CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
30 August
12:41
Space Shuttle Discovery Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-41-D NASA Low Earth Satellite deployment5 September
15:37
Successful
SBS-4 SBS Current: Graveyard
Operational: Geosynchronous
CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Telstar 302 AT&T Current: Graveyard
Operational: Geosynchronous
CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Leasat 2 US Navy Current: Graveyard
Operational: Geosynchronous
CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
OAST-1 NASA Low Earth (Discovery) Solar array R&D5 September
15:37
Successful
Manned orbital flight with six astronauts
Maiden flight of Space Shuttle Discovery

September

8 September
21:41
Atlas E/SGS-2 Vandenberg SLC-3W
USA-5 (GPS-10) US Air Force Medium Earth NavigationIn orbitSuccessful

October

5 October
11:03
Space Shuttle Challenger Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-41-G NASA Low Earth Satellite deployment13 October
16:26
Successful
ERBS NASA Low Earth Radiation budget observationIn orbitSuccessful
OSTA-3 NASA Low Earth (Challenger) Earth imaging13 October
16:26
Successful
ORS NASA Low Earth (Challenger) Satellite refuelling demonstration13 October
16:26
Successful
Manned orbital flight with seven astronauts including the first Canadian space traveller
Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B)
ERBS retired on 14 October 2005

November

8 November
12:15
Space Shuttle Discovery Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-51-A NASA Low Earth Satellite deployment and retrieval16 November
11:59
Successful
Anik D2 Telesat Canada Current: Graveyard
Operational: Geosynchronous
CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Leasat 1 US Navy Current: Graveyard
Operational: Geosynchronous
CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
Manned orbital flight with five astronauts
Anik D2 retired on 31 January 1995
Retrieved Westar 6 and Palapa B2 satellites which were stranded in Low Earth orbit after PAM failures during deployment from Space Shuttle Challenger on mission STS-41-B in February.
10 November
01:14
Ariane 3 Kourou ELA Arianespace
Spacenet F2 Spacenet Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful
MARECS 2 ESA Geosynchronous CommunicationsIn orbitSuccessful

December

4 December
18:03
Titan 34D Vandenberg SLC-4E
USA-6 (KH-11-6) NRO Sun-synchronous ReconnaissanceIn orbitSuccessful
12 December
10:42
Atlas E/Star-37S-ISS Vandenberg SLC-3W
NOAA 9 (NOAA-F) NOAA Sun-synchronous MeteorologyIn orbitSuccessful
22 December
00:02
Titan 34D/Transtage Cape Canaveral LC-40
USA-7 (DSP-12) US Air Force Geosynchronous Early warningIn orbitSuccessful

Deep-space rendezvous

There were no deep-space rendezvous in 1984.

EVAs

Start date/time Duration End time Spacecraft Crew Remarks
7 February 5 hours
55 minutes
STS-41-B
Challenger
Bruce McCandless II
Robert L. Stewart
McCandless and Stewart rode on the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMUs) during the first untethered EVAs in history. Both astronauts practiced using tools and procedures for the planned capture and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite to be performed in a subsequent flight.[1]
9 February 6 hours
17 minutes
STS-41-B
Challenger
Bruce McCandless II
Robert L. Stewart
Continued testing the MMUs and practice with tools and procedures to be used with recovery and repair of the SMM satellite.[1]
8 April
14:18
2 hours
38 minutes
16:56 STS-41-C
Challenger
George Nelson
James van Hoften
Nelson rode the MMU to the SMM satellite. Van Hoften stood by in the payload bay to provide any needed assistance. After three unsuccessful attempts to capture the SMM with the Trunnion Pin Acquisition Device (TPAD) tool and one attempt to grab the satellite by hand, the spacewalkers returned to Challenger. The SMM was recovered the next day with the RMS.[2]
11 April
08:58
6 hours
44 minutes
15:42 STS-41-C
Challenger
George Nelson
James van Hoften
Completed repair of the SMM satellite and then continued testing of the MMU.[3]
23 April
04:31
4 hours
20 minutes
08:46 Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Installed a new ladder to reach the ruptured Main Oxidizer Line on Salyut 7. First of five EVAs to conduct the repair.
26 April
02:40
4 hours
56 minutes
07:40 Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Removed installation and installed a valve in the spare oxidizer line. Second of five EVAs to repair the Main Oxidizer Line on the station.
29 April
01:35
2 hours
45 minutes
04:20 Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Installed a bypass line around the damaged section of the Main Oxidizer Line on the station. Third of five repair EVAs.
3 May
23:15
2 hours
45 minutes
4 May
02:00
Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Installed a second bypass line and replaced thermal insulation at the Main Oxidizer Line of the station. Fourth of five repair EVAs.
18 May
17:52
3 hours
5 minutes
20:57 Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Installed two new solar arrays onto the space station.
25 July
14:55
3 hours
35 minutes
18:29 Salyut 7 EP-4 Vladimir Dzhanibekov
Svetlana Savitskaya
Tested the URI multi-purpose tool with several metal samples.
Savitskaya became the first women in history to perform an EVA.
8 August
08:46
5 hours 13:46 Salyut 7 EO-3 Leonid Kizim
Vladimir Solovyov
Using a pneumatic press tool delivered by Soyuz T-12, the cosmonauts completed the fifth and final EVA to repair the damaged Main Oxidizer Line of the station by crimping the ends of the ruptured pipe.
11 October
15:38
3 hours
29 minutes
19:05 STS-41-G
Challenger
David Leestma
Kathryn Sullivan
Demonstrated the use of the Orbital Refueling System, including the installation of an ORS valve maintenance kit.[4]
Sullivan was the first American women and the second women in history to conduct an EVA.[5]
12 November
13:25
6 hours 19:25 STS-51-A
Discovery
Joseph P. Allen
Dale Gardner
Allen rode the MMU to the Palapa B2 satellite and retrieved it into the payload bay. Gardner and Allen then secured the satellite in the payload bay for return to Earth.[6]
14 November
11:09
5 hours
42 minutes
16:51 STS-51-A
Discovery
Joseph P. Allen
Dale Gardner
Gardner rode the MMU to the Westar 6 satellite and retrieved it into the payload bay. Allen and Gardner then secured the satellite in the payload bay for return to Earth.[6]

References

  • Bergin, Chris. "NASASpaceFlight.com".
  • Clark, Stephen. "Spaceflight Now".
  • Kelso, T.S. "Satellite Catalog (SATCAT)". CelesTrak.
  • Krebs, Gunter. "Chronology of Space Launches".
  • Kyle, Ed. "Space Launch Report".
  • McDowell, Jonathan. "Jonathan's Space Report".
  • Pietrobon, Steven. "Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive".
  • Wade, Mark. "Encyclopedia Astronautica".
  • Webb, Brian. "Southwest Space Archive".
  • Zak, Anatoly. "Russian Space Web".
  • "ISS Calendar". Spaceflight 101.
  • "NSSDCA Master Catalog". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • "Space Calendar". NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
  • "Space Information Center". JAXA.
  • "Хроника освоения космоса" [Chronicle of space exploration]. CosmoWorld (in Russian).
Generic references:

Footnotes

  1. Collins, Jr., Michael A. (March 1984). "STS 41B National Space Transportation System Program Mission Report" (PDF). NASA. p. 8. Retrieved 15 February 2009.
  2. "Space Shuttle Flight 11 (STS-41C)". Space Shuttle Video Library. National Space Society. 2008. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  3. Collins, Michael (May 1984). "STS-41C National Space Transportation System Program Mission Report" (PDF). NASA. p. 5. Retrieved 18 February 2009.
  4. Collins, Jr., Michael A. (November 1984). "STS 41-G National Space Transportation System Program Mission Report" (PDF). NASA. p. 3. Retrieved 18 February 2009.
  5. Wade, Mark (2008). "Sullivan web page". Encyclopedia Astronautica web site. Archived from the original on 14 February 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2009.
  6. "Space Shuttle Flight 14 (STS-51A)". Space Shuttle Video Library. National Space Society. July 2008. Retrieved 20 February 2009.


This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.