Types of swords

The term sword used here is a narrow definition. This is not a general List of premodern combat weapons and does not include the machete or similar "sword-like" weapons.

This is a list of types of swords.

African swords

North African/ Arabian swords

East African swords

  • Billao (Somali)
  • Shotel (Ethiopian)
  • Gorade (Sometimes also Romanticized as "Gurade") (Ethiopian)

West African swords

  • Ida (Yoruban)
  • Eben (Benin – Yoruba name: Bini, Local name: UBinu)
  • Ada (Benin – Yoruba name: Bini, Local name: UBinu)
  • Akrafena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Nsuaefena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Afenatene (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Afenanta (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Mpomponsuo (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Bosomfena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))

Central African swords

  • Ndombe (Ngulu?)
  • Mambele (Northern Congo Region?)
  • Ilwoon (Congo Region)

Southern African swords

  • Bakatwa (Shona People)

Asian swords

East Asian swords

China
Japan
Korea
  • Hwandudaedo (환두대도; 环首大刀)
  • Saingeom (사인검)
  • Jedokgum (제독검)
  • Ssangeom (쌍도; 双刀; 쌍검: 双剣)

Southeast Asian swords

Swords and knives found in Southeast Asia are influenced by Indian, Chinese as well as Middle Eastern and European forms.

Indonesia/Malaysia
Myanmar
Philippines
Thailand

South Asian Swords

Bhutan
India
Bangladesh
Sri Lanka

West and Central Asian swords

All of the Islamic world during the 16th to 18th century, including the Ottoman Empire and Persia were influenced by the "scimitar" type of single-edged curved sword. Via the Mameluke sword this also gave rise to the European cavalry sabre.

Terms for the "scimitar" curved sword:

European swords

Ancient history

Post-classical history

Modern history

North American swords

  • U.S. regulation swords (sabres, and in some instances fascine knives shaped like short swords)

See also

References

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