Harry Gideonse

Harry David Gideonse (May 17, 1901 – March 12, 1985)[1][2] was a Dutch-born American economist. He was the second President of Brooklyn College, from 1939 to 1966, and Chancellor of the New School for Social Research from 1966 until 1975.

Harry David Gideonse
Born(1901-05-17)May 17, 1901
DiedMarch 12, 1985(1985-03-12) (aged 83)
ResidenceGreat Neck, New York, and East Setauket, New York
Alma mater
Known for
Home townRochester, New York
PredecessorWilliam Boylan
SuccessorFrancis Kilcoyne
Board member of
Spouse(s)Edmee Koch
Children2

Early and personal life and education

Gideonse was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, to Martin Cornelius and Johanna Jacoba Helena Magdalena (de Lange) Gideonse.[3] His family emigrated to the United States in 1904, settling in Rochester, New York, where Gidonese attended elementary school.[4][1][5][6]

He married Edmee Koch, of Geneva, Switzerland.[7] They had two sons.[8]

He attended Columbia University (B.S. in Economics, 1923; A.M. in Economics, 1924), and the University of Geneva (Diplome des Hautes Etudes Internationales, 1928).[9][2][10][11]

Biography

At Rutgers University, beginning in 1928 he was as assistant professor of economics.[2][9] At the University of Chicago, Gideonse was an associate professor of economics.[2][9] He also taught economics at Barnard College (where he was Chairman of the Departments of Economics from 1938 to 1939 and Sociology) and Columbia University.[8][9]

Gideonse was the second President of Brooklyn College, from 1939 to 1966.[2][8][9] During his tenure Brooklyn College was one of the top colleges in the US in terms of the number of alumni receiving doctorate degrees.[8] In the 1940s Gideonse made novel changes in the college curriculum with a greater emphasis on electives, an approach that later became standard in colleges.[12] In May 1983, Brooklyn College renamed its library in his honor.[8][4]

He was Chancellor of the New School for Social Research from 1966 until 1975, when he retired.[2][8]

Gideonse wrote Transfert des réparations et le plan Dawes (1928), The International Bank, The Higher Learning in a Democracy, The Economic Policy of the United States, Introductory General Course in the Study of Contemporary Society (1939), American Policy in Indonesia (1949), The economic foreign policy of the United States (1953), On the Educational Statesmanship of a Free Society (1959), Against the Running Tide (1967), and The Year 2000: The Future Planners and Education (1969), and co-wrote a number of other books.[8][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21]

He served on the executive committee of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations.[8] He was Chairman of the Board for a number of years of Freedom House and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.[8][22]

Gideonse, who had lived in Great Neck, New York, and in East Setauket, New York, died on March 12, 1985, at the age of 83 in the Port Jefferson New York Nursing Home, three weeks after his wife died.[22][8]

References

  1. "Dr. Harry D. Gideonse Dead". New York Times & Arno Press. 18 March 1985 via Google Books.
  2. Steele, G. R. (2018). The Economic Thought of Henry Calvert Simons: Crown Prince of the Chicago School. Routledge via Google Books.
  3. Block, Maxine (1968). Current Biography Yearbook. H. W. Wilson Company via Google Books.
  4. Waggoner, Walter H. (14 March 1985). "Dr. Harry D. Gideonse Dead; Ex-Head of Brooklyn College" via NYTimes.com.
  5. Carletta, David Mark (2009). Frances R. Grant's Pan American Activities, 1929-1949. Michigan State University. History via Google Books.
  6. Coulton, Thomas Evans (1955). A City College in Action: Struggle and Achievement at Brooklyn College, 1930-1955. Harper via Google Books.
  7. Vlekke, Bernard Hubertus Maria; Beets, Henry (1942). Hollanders who Helped Build America. American Biographical Company via Google Books.
  8. Service, N. Y. Times News. "HARRY D. GIDEONSE, 83; HEADED BROOKLYN COLLEGE". chicagotribune.com.
  9. "Biographical note", New School for Social Research Libraries & Archives.
  10. American higher education a documentary history. 1961 via Google Books.
  11. Cattell, James McKeen (1968). American Men of Science: A Biographical Directory. Bowker via Google Books.
  12. Devine, Mary Elizabeth; Summerfield, Carol (2013). International Dictionary of University Histories. Routledge via Google Books.
  13. Harry D. Gideonse Against the Running Tide (1967)
  14. Gideonse, Harry David (1953). The economic foreign policy of the United States. National Bank of Egypt via Google Books.
  15. Gideonse, Harry David (1969). The Year 2000: The Future Planners and Education. Educational Research Council via Google Books.
  16. Harry David Gideonse. American Policy in Indonesia - Google Books
  17. Harry David Gideonse. Transfert des réparations et le plan Dawes - Google Books
  18. Harry David Gideonse. The economic foreign policy of the United States - Google Books
  19. Harry David Gideonse. Introductory General Course in the Study of Contemporary Society (Social Science I) - University of Chicago - Google Books
  20. Harry David Gideonse. On the Educational Statesmanship of a Free Society - Google Books
  21. Harry David Gideonse. The Year 2000: The Future Planners and Education - Google Books
  22. Judiciary, United States Congress Senate Committee on the (1952). Subversive Influence in the Educational Process: Hearings Before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws to the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-second Congress, Second Session[-Eighty-fourth Congress, First Session]. U.S. Government Printing Office via Google Books.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.