Acrylic resin

An Acrylic resin is a thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic substance derived from acrylic acid, methacrylic acid or other related compounds. One example is polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate, which makes a crosslinked polymer when treated with polyisocyanates. Such materials are a useful component in some paints.[1]

Advantages as an ingredient in paint

Acrylic resin is a common ingredient in latex paint (UK: "emulsion paint"). Interior and exterior latex paints with a greater proportion of acrylic resin, versus vinyl, offer better stain protection, greater water resistance, better adhesion, greater resistance to cracking and blistering, and resistance to alkali cleaners.[2] Acrylic resin is considered extremely weatherproof. This makes it ideal for outdoor applications. In solid form acrylic resin can last for decades. It does not yellow when exposed to sunlight, even after many years. Acrylic resins are the materials which when added to latex (U.K. Emulsion) increases its gloss properties, mechanical properties i.e. scratch resistance, and improves the gloss (shine) compared to vinyl-only resin.

Microbial degradation

Melanin-producing Cladosporium fungi damaged dried acrylic resin samples in the Milan cathedral.[3][4]

See also

References

  1. Stoye, D.; Funke, W.; Hoppe, L.; et al. (2006). "Paints and Coatings". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a18_359.pub2.
  2. Dean Sickler. "Water-based Alchemy". Archived from the original on August 29, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  3. Cappitelli F; Principi P; Pedrazzani R; Toniolo L; Sorlini C (2007). "Bacterial and fungal deterioration of the Milan Cathedral marble treated with protective synthetic resins". Science of the Total Environment. 385: 172–81. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2007.06.022. PMID 17658586.
  4. Cappitelli F; Nosanchuk JD; Casadevall A; Toniolo L; Brusetti L; Florio S; Principi P; Borin S; Sorlini C (Jan 2007). "Synthetic consolidants attacked by melanin-producing fungi: case study of the biodeterioration of Milan (Italy) cathedral marble treated with acrylics". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 73: 271–277. doi:10.1128/AEM.02220-06. PMC 1797126. PMID 17071788.
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