22.2 surround sound

22.2 or Hamasaki 22.2 (named after Kimio Hamasaki, a senior research engineer at NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories in Japan) is the surround sound component of Super Hi-Vision (a new television standard with 16 times the pixel resolution of HDTV). It has been developed by NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories. It uses 24 speakers (including two subwoofers) arranged in three layers.[1]

Channels

The channel numbers and labels are:[2]

AES

Pair No./Ch No.

Channel

No.

Label Name
1/1 1 FL Front left
1/2 2 FR Front right
2/1 3 FC Front center
2/2 4 LFE1 LFE-1
3/1 5 BL Back left
3/2 6 BR Back right
4/1 7 FLc Front left center
4/2 8 FRc Front right center
5/1 9 BC Back center
5/2 10 LFE2 LFE-2
6/1 11 SiL Side left
6/2 12 SiR Side right
7/1 13 TpFL Top front left
7/2 14 TpFR Top front right
8/1 15 TpFC Top front center
8/2 16 TpC Top center
9/1 17 TpBL Top back left
9/2 18 TpBR Top back right
10/1 19 TpSiL Top side left
10/2 20 TpSiR Top side right
11/1 21 TpBC Top back center
11/2 22 BtFC Bottom front center
12/1 23 BtFL Bottom front left
12/2 24 BtFR Bottom front right

Channel numbers up to 6 represent the same as those in a 5.1 channel system. There are then a further 5 listener-plane channels, 9 overhead channels, arranged in a square, and a row of 3 further channels at the bottom front, plus the additional LFE channel.

Demonstrations

Reviews

See also

References

  1. "22.2 Multichannel Audio Format Standardization Activity" (PDF). NHK World. Retrieved February 17, 2014.
  2. "Ultra High Definition Television - Audio Characteristics And Audio Channel Mapping For Program Production". Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. 2008. SMPTE ST 2036-2:2008. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. Sangani, Kris (2008-10-11). "A game of leapfrog". Engineering & Technology. 3 (17): 8. doi:10.1049/et:20081720. Archived from the original on 2009-01-10. Retrieved 2008-10-31.
  4. Sweney, Mark (2011-08-28). "BBC plans to use 3D and 'super hi-vision' for London Olympics". The Guardian. London.
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